how to get cheap broadband

How to find cheap broadband deals

Do you need fibre? Top picks, how to switch & much more

Millions blindly overpay for broadband and line rent as costs rocket when promo deals end. So if you're out of contract, check now if you can save £100s/year by switching to our top picks below, or try our Broadband Unbundled tool to compare the best broadband, line and TV deals available in your area.

To benchmark, those out of contract typically pay BT £52/mth and Virgin £44/mth for fibre.

10 broadband need-to-knows

These are the golden rules to give you chapter and verse, but if you just want a quick comparison, try our Broadband Unbundled tool.

  • For most, switching during this time shouldn't be a problem – even with current lockdown restrictions – as your switch can often be done remotely, with no one needing access to your home.

    However, for the small number of people switching from a cable provider (eg, Virgin Media) to one using the Openreach network (which is most other providers, including BT, Plusnet, Shell, Sky and Vodafone), you'll likely need a BT Openreach engineer to come into your home. They will tell you if they need to beforehand and Openreach says engineers will obey social distancing and take extra precautions to keep you safe (though there may be a delay right now as it is prioritising vulnerable customers and those who have completely lost service).

    If you're switching to Virgin, 40% of people will need an engineer to come into their home. Its engineers have been working throughout the lockdown period, but are following social distancing safety guidelines.

    We've been working to answer all of your coronavirus-related broadband questions, including the support you can get if you're struggling to pay your bill due to the current situation – see below.

    For what happens when you switch, see how switching works.

    Quick questions

      • Switching to Virgin? A minority will need an engineer to come round. 60% of eligible Virgin customers won't need an engineer sent round – if you're in that group, it'll tell you BEFORE you sign up. If you're one of the 40% that do, an engineer may need to come into your home or just go to a nearby exchange, but you won't be told which in advance. While they'll follow social distancing rules, you may decide against it at that point.

        Virgin Media has said that three days before a scheduled visit, it will text you to ask if anyone living at your property has been asked to self-isolate or has flu-like symptoms. If you answer 'yes', then your visit will be rescheduled for two weeks later.

      • No engineers required for other switches, unless you need a new BT line (which you may do if switching from Virgin). If you're currently a Virgin customer, as you're on cable you'd need a BT Openreach line unless you've the right wires from an old connection. BT Openreach will tell you if an engineer needs to come to you before scheduling a visit.

        There's a chance you could have a bit of a wait getting set up if you're switching from Virgin, as BT Openreach has a priority list due to current restrictions and a new line is deemed non-urgent.

        BT Openreach told us at the start of January that it's "prioritising urgent critical repairs for those customers who need a more stable connection and to avoid a total loss of service. This will mean that non-urgent provisions, such as those who already have a superfast broadband service and require us to work inside homes, may be delayed".

        It added: "We will continue to service those in need (eg, vulnerable customers and those who need connectivity for homeschooling) and who have a service of less than 30Mbps. We will prioritise this work, whereas non-urgent new appointments relating to ultrafast products will encounter delays and will be pushed back to 1 March 2021 onwards."

        If an engineer does need to enter your home and your appointment takes place, Openreach says they'll be obeying social distancing and taking extra precautions to keep you safe.

    • Your new broadband provider will do its best to resolve any problems you may experience with a new connection. It can also carry out checks remotely to identify any issues affecting your broadband connection.

      Openreach – which looks after the majority of the broadband network (except cable) – is visiting homes if you've a total loss of service. It's said that while in most cases work needed can be done outside of your home "there may be some circumstances where an engineer needs to enter your home" and, if they do, the firm will call you beforehand to talk about how to make the visit as "short and safe as possible".

      In the unlikely event a repair can't be made straightaway, providers are working on providing customers with additional ways of staying connected. These include sending out 4G dongle devices and extra mobile data (if you have a phone contract or Sim with your provider), and BT and Vodafone told us they could even send out basic mobile phones to customers.

    • If you're switching away from Virgin and to a firm using the Openreach network (BT, Sky, Vodafone etc), you may need an Openreach engineer to come into your home. If this is the case, it'll call you beforehand to talk about how to make the visit as "short and safe as possible".

      However, in a small number of cases your switch can be done remotely (ie, if you have had an Openreach line previously and it's still working) – so check with the provider. If you're out of contract and can't switch, make sure you haggle for a better deal.

    • A number of providers, including BT, Sky and Vodafone, have told us they'll help those who are struggling to pay their bills. They haven't given us specifics about what help they'll provide, but they've asked anyone affected to contact them as soon as possible to discuss their options.

      This follows regulator Ofcom telling firms they must do all they can to keep people's broadband running.

      Ofcom told us: "We expect providers to avoid disconnecting customers, as this is a serious step that should only be used as a last resort. We have called on providers to revisit their debt and disconnection practices, to ensure sufficient support is offered to customers who may be struggling to pay their bills."

  • Broadband is the standard way to connect to the internet, but the key differentiator is speed, measured in megabits per second (Mb) – and the faster the speed, generally the pricier it gets.

    • Standard – with average speeds of 10-11Mb. This is the basic level, sometimes called ADSL.

    • Fast fibre-optic broadband – average speeds of 35-36Mb (though some offer 50Mb). This is delivered through more sophisticated glass or plastic wires before connecting to your home.

    • Superfast fibre-optic – with average speeds around 63Mb. Uses the same fibre wires, it's just faster.

    • Ultrafast fibre-optic broadband – with average speeds usually above 100Mb. This requires more sophisticated wiring usually direct to your home, and is only available from a limited number of suppliers.

    See our Broadband Unbundled tool for the top deals across all speeds.

    Do I really need fibre-optic broadband?

    Fast fibre is best for heavy users – if you do loads of streaming, online gaming, downloading or have multiple users in your home – as doing lots at the same time slows you down.

    Anything faster is very much a luxury – best if you've a large household with many devices, you stream 4K content or 'normal' fibre isn't fast enough for you.

    If you just use the web for basic tasks, such as emails and the odd bit of browsing, then an average of 11Mb speed should be fine.

    Quick questions

    • At peak times or when a lot of people are using the internet at the same time, some providers will prioritise certain traffic, meaning your connection may slow down to ensure everyone receives decent speeds. This is called traffic management.

    • There are a number of free speed tests online to find what speed you're actually getting, such as Broadband Genie's Speed Test and Ookla's Speedtest.net. Try it at different times of the day to get a range of speeds, as it can vary.

      Regulator Ofcom also has a Coverage Checker, which shows the maximum speeds capable down the line at any postcode, though it won't be precise enough to check your home.

    • There are a number of simple checks and fixes if you are struggling speed-wise. There's a full checklist of tips and tricks to get quicker in Broadband Speed Boosting.

    • Almost all deals come with unlimited data now, particularly the deals we feature below and on our Broadband Unbundled tool. This means you can download as much as you want, without the fear of being charged for extra data (each gigabyte). The fact that the best deals have no restriction is good news given our data use has rocketed with catch-up TV, box sets and movie streaming gobbling it up – downloading an episode of Game of Thrones in HD uses up roughly 1GB.

      The other reason for cheer at the competitiveness of unlimited data deals is packages with download limits tend to have costly charges if you go over – BT charges £2.20/GB when you breach the limit.

      Though most new deals offer unlimited data, some legacy packages would still charge for exceeding your allowance.

  • To help you navigate this postcode lottery, our Broadband Unbundled tool shows which best buys are available where you live. Standard-speed broadband is available in the vast majority of the UK, but there are still odd pockets where you can't get it.

    With fibre, it's still being rolled out across the UK, though over 90% should now be able to get it. Most big cities have access, but some rural areas may not. Ultrafast fibre with top speeds of 350Mb is only available to roughly 50% of the UK, while faster speeds are currently only available to a small number.

  • It varies, but plan for about 10 working days, though if you need an engineer it is partly down to availability (and there could be delays due to the pandemic).

    On the day itself, don't worry if you fear Facebook withdrawal, as you're only likely to be offline for a few hours, or maybe hardly at all. And you can use your mobile data to cover any outage until you get online.

    Here are some more key details:

    • Often, there's no need for an engineer to come round. Only if you need a new line or on some fibre installations. Otherwise, just plug any new kit you're sent in.

      Switching to Virgin? 60% of eligible Virgin customers won't need an engineer sent round – if you're in that group, it'll tell you BEFORE you sign up. If you're one of the 40% that do, an engineer may need to come into your home or just go to a nearby exchange, but you won't be told which in advance.

    • You don't usually need to tell your current provider. The new firm usually does the communication work unless you're switching to or from Virgin – here, you must tell your old provider.

    • Many firms insist you pay to receive their router. Though the cost isn't usually prohibitive and we include router costs (where applicable) in all the deals below.

    More switching FAQs

    • Mostly no, but it doesn't hurt just to be sure. Moving to or from Virgin can be slightly different – see below.

      Switching broadband to and from companies other than Virgin Media: Every major provider except Virgin (200+ in total, including BT, Sky and TalkTalk) is on the BT Openreach network. If you're switching between them, when you sign up for a new deal it's the new supplier's job to notify your existing one and cancel the contract. You don't need to do anything else.

      Moving broadband to or from Virgin: As Virgin Media runs its own network, the switching process is a little more complicated. You'll need to contact your existing supplier yourself to cancel. It should then give you a termination date, so try to coordinate this with your Virgin Media start date to avoid loss of service. This is a standard process and you should be able to do it without much hassle.

      Switching TV (whether as part of a package or a separate deal): If you're switching broadband, it works as above. If you're switching a TV deal – whether or not it's with the same provider as your broadband – you'll need to call up and cancel the package yourself. Typically you'll need to give 30 days' notice. If you're still in contract, you're also likely to have to pay the remainder of the contract to get out of it. As you have to cancel the old TV deal and sign up to the new one, you'll need to ensure you time it right to avoid paying two TV providers in one month.

    • Since you'll likely be signing a 12-month, 18-month or even two-year contract, it's worth checking feedback before diving in. We include the results of our latest broadband customer satisfaction poll in our Broadband Unbundled tool, so you can see how each provider ranked with other MoneySavers. For the full results, see our latest broadband customer service poll results.

      Our forum's Broadband board also includes a wealth of feedback, as do sites such as Broadband.co.ukThinkBroadband and ISP Review.

    • You won't face extra costs if you're no longer under contract (except with Shell – see below), though you may need to give at least 14-30 days' notice depending on your provider.

      If you're still within the minimum term of your contract, you usually have to pay 'early termination fees' to leave. Each provider calculates these differently, but it generally depends on the amount of time left on your contract. They should always be less than the cost of the remaining charges on the contract.

      Shell Energy Broadband will charge £15 if you're leaving it, regardless of whether you're in contract or not. Its T&Cs state: "Regardless of whether you are inside or outside your minimum period, if you terminate or cancel your contract at any time (other than during the cooling-off period) and we are not at fault, you will be charged a cease charge."

      However, if you sign up to Shell Energy Broadband through one of our MSE Blagged deals, you won't be charged this cease charge when you leave (providing you're out of contract when you switch).

  • Maybe. It's important to understand that these advertised speeds are based on the average speed received by at least 50% of a provider's current customer base between 8pm and 10pm – when most people are online.

    Most have signed up to a code of practice committing to give a personalised estimate and a minimum guaranteed speed before you sign up. So since 1 March 2019, if your speeds drop below this minimum for three consecutive days, you can ask your provider to check for a fault – and get it fixed if so. See our Boost Broadband Speed guide for how to check your speed.

    If it remains unresolved for 30 days, you should be able to exit your contract penalty-free. This applies both to broadband-only deals AND packaged deals that include TV and a landline phone, provided you bought them at the same time as the broadband. If you're unhappy with your provider, try free complaints handling tool Resolver.

    If you signed up before 1 March 2019, you may still be able to exit your contract penalty-free – though there's no time limit for providers to fix your speed issues, and you wouldn't be able to get out of a bundled TV deal.

  • Seven providers – BT, Sky (including Now Broadband), TalkTalk, Virgin Media, Hyperoptic, Utility Warehouse and Zen – have signed up to Ofcom's Automatic Compensation Scheme, which means customers could get money back from their broadband/landline provider when certain things go wrong. Ofcom says it covers 90% of broadband users.

    • If your landline or broadband stops working and is not repaired within two working days of reporting it, you'll receive £8, and then £8 for each day it remains unfixed.

    • If your new landline or broadband service is not up and running on the day promised, you'll receive £5 for each calendar day it's delayed, including the missed start date. There's no limit on this, so you'll keep accruing the compensation until it's sorted.
       
    • If an engineer doesn't arrive for an appointment as scheduled, or it's cancelled with less than 24 hours' notice, you'll receive £25.

    However, right now, as coronavirus continues to present challenges, regulator Ofcom says it may allow providers to refuse to pay automatic compensation in some situations. For example, where an engineer can't come into your home if you need to self-isolate. But your provider must tell you beforehand if it can't pay you compensation and give a reason why.

    If you are due compensation, it's automatically paid as bill credit within 30 working days of the issue. If you choose to leave your provider while you still have bill credit to spend or before you get it, this will be refunded to the bank account you use to pay your direct debit or sent as a cheque.

    Quick questions

    • So far, only the biggies are signed up to the scheme (which covers 90% of customers), but the biggies aren't always the cheapest. This opens up the question of whether to stick with a compensation scheme provider. Here's Martin's view...

      "There is a huge price difference between the very cheapest providers and what most people pay. Someone on an ongoing BT standard broadband contract can save £400/yr switching to the cheapest.

      "Provided that company has a decent service record, I wouldn't pay a big premium for the compensation. Especially as I hope that quite soon most competitive providers will join it. Yet if a compensation scheme member is cheap, pounce on it."

    • Whether or not your provider has signed up to the code, you should still complain if you have issues. A company can't try to fix problems if you don't report them.
      To help, there's a free tool offered by a firm called Resolver that can draft your complaint and manage it too. If the complaint isn't sorted, Resolver can escalate it to the free Communications and Internet Services Adjudication Scheme (CISAS) or Ombudsman Services, depending on the company you're complaining about.
  • Most broadband packages require you to have a line as the broadband is ultimately delivered down it. However, most providers still make you take out a standard line rental deal as if you'd use the phone rather than a discounted price for broadband only.

    There are a limited number of broadband-only deals, mainly from Virgin Media and BT, but these are usually expensive (though when it has a hot deal, we'll feature it below) so it's almost always cheaper to get a broadband and landline package. Of course, you could just get the line and simply not use it.

  • Switching usually nets you the cheapest prices, but if you are out of contract – or nearing the end of your contract – you could try to haggle your price.

    As there's stiff competition, companies are frantic to keep hold of customers. That is why in our polls on haggling with service companies, communication providers are frequently among the easiest to haggle with.

    In our November 2020 survey of 4,000+ MoneySavers, more than 80% who tried had success with BT, Sky, TalkTalk and Virgin. For top tips, see our Haggle with Service Providers guide.

  • It's worth speaking to your broadband provider as soon as possible if you're going to have trouble meeting your monthly bill. Some of the large providers have schemes in place to help customers who've encountered financial problems.

    If you receive universal credit, you may qualify for cut-price broadband from the likes of BT and Virgin Media.

    What are the big providers offering?

    • You'll be able to get BT's Basic + Broadband package, which offers 10Mb broadband, line rental and free weekend calls for £10.07/mth, if you're on one of the following benefits:

      • Income support
      • Income-based jobseeker's allowance
      • Pension credit (guaranteed element)
      • Income-related employment and support allowance (ESA)
      • Universal credit (and are on zero earnings)

      There's a £9.99 postage fee to have the router sent to your home.

      How to get it

      You'll need to call BT on 0800 800 864 to ask for an application form. Once it arrives, you'll need to fill it in and post it back to BT.

    • Universal credit claimants can get Virgin Media Essential Broadband, which offers up to 15Mbps for £15/mth, with no fixed contract term. Virgin Media has said that Essential Broadband customers will never see price rises.

      This is a broadband-only package, so you won't be charged for line rental. Sadly, if you're an existing Virgin Media customer with a landline, you won't be able to keep the phone service as part of the Essential Broadband package.

      If you stop receiving universal credit, you can stay on the package, but the price will be hiked to £23/mth, so it'll be worth looking for a better deal.

      Customers who want to switch away from Essential Broadband will need to give 30 days' notice.

      How to get it

      Existing Virgin Media customers can apply via this link.

      The company told us that customers will be asked to provide proof that they receive universal credit once they've filled in an online application form.

  • Under rules from regulator Ofcom, if the contract was taken out after 23 January 2014, and your landline, broadband or mobile (but not TV) firm raises prices without warning you before you signed up, then you are allowed to leave penalty-free.

    But do check the T&Cs, as providers may state in there that they reserve the right to hike prices, which would count as a warning.

    Price changes are usually made in line with inflation between February and April each year, using either the Retail Prices Index (RPI) or Consumer Prices Index (CPI) measure of inflation.

    But recently, some firms have changed the way they raise prices each year, opting to increase by inflation plus a percentage amount on top. We've seen such recent announcements from biggies including BTVirgin MediaPlusnetVodafone and Three.

    If a provider hikes your monthly bill and its T&Cs don't allow this, then you can leave your contract penalty-free.

    If it happens without warning, all you have to do is tell your provider within 30 days of getting notification from it, and you can then leave penalty-free. That said, only do so if you can find a better price.

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Top deals: Standard speed broadband & line rental

We've got our pick of the best deals for new customers of each firm below, but to find out what's available in your area – and to compare more options – try Broadband Unbundled, our broadband, phone line and TV comparison tool.

MSE analysis logo

Standard speed b'band (10-29Mb) – what we'd go for

Right now, if you just want standard speeds, there's our blagged Shell Energy deal. It's £17.99/mth, but you'll get a £50 automatic bill credit within three months. Factor it in and it's equivalent to £13.83/mth over the 12-month contract.

 

PROVIDER & AVG SPEED EQUIV COST (1) HOW IT WORKS
Shell Energy*
11Mb
MSE Blagged
Top pick
£13.83/mth Via our Shell Energy* link, you'll pay £17.99/mth, but you'll get an automatic £50 bill credit within 3mths. This makes it a total outlay of £165.88 over the 12-month contract, equivalent to £13.83/mth.
Ends 11.59pm Mon 22 Mar.
Plusnet*
10Mb
£14.34/mth Go via this Broadbandchoices Plusnet* link and it's £18.50/mth, but you can claim a £50 prepaid Mastercard, almost as good as cash. Factor that in and it's equivalent to £14.34/mth over the 12-month contract. How to claim.
Ends 11.59pm Wed 3 Mar.
Note: Some firms increase prices in line with inflation annually, so prices could change mid-contract. (1) To compare, we use 'equivalent prices' – adding all fixed costs, deducting any promo cash/vouchers and averaging over the contract.

Top deals: Fast fibre broadband & line rental

We've got our pick of the best fibre broadband deals for new customers of each firm below, but to find out what's available in your area and compare further options, try Broadband Unbundled, our broadband, phone line and TV comparison tool.

MSE analysis logo

Fast fibre b'band (30-55Mb) – what we'd go for

The cheapest at this speed is our blagged Shell Energy deal. It's £21.99/mth, but you'll get a £50 automatic bill credit within three months of joining. Factor that in and it's equivalent to £17.83/mth over the 12-month contract.

Shell scored OK in our recent service poll, but if you want a provider known for top service, we've blagged a deal with Zen. It scored 9.3/10 in our latest service poll and has topped every poll we've done since 2017. Many tech websites also rave about its router, which they say makes its Wi-Fi more reliable, and its knowledgeable customer service staff. While you can pay less elsewhere, if good service is key, sign up via our link and it'll waive the usual £19.99 set-up fee, so you just pay Zen's regular £29.99/mth over the 12-month contract.

PROVIDER & AVG SPEED EQUIV COST (1) HOW IT WORKS
Shell Energy*
35Mb
MSE Blagged
Top pick
£17.83/mth Via our Shell Energy* link, you'll pay £21.99/mth, but you'll get an automatic £50 bill credit within 3mths. This makes it a total outlay of £213.88 over the 12-month contract, equivalent to £17.83/mth.
Ends 11.59pm Mon 22 Mar.
Plusnet*
36Mb
£18.89/mth Via this Broadbandchoices Plusnet* link, you'll pay £22.50/mth, but you can claim a £65 prepaid Mastercard, which is almost as good as cash. Factor that in and it's equivalent to £18.89/mth over the 18-month contact. See how to claim.
Ends 11.59pm Wed 4 Mar.
BT*
50Mb
£25.08/mth

Not the cheapest, but some users prefer a big name. Via this BroadbandChoices BT* link, it's £27.99/mth, but you can claim a £70 prepaid Mastercard from BT, which is almost as good as cash. When this is factored in, it's equivalent to £25.08/mth over the 24-month contract. See how to claim.

Ends 11.59pm Thu 4 Mar.

Zen*
35Mb
£29.99/mth Not the cheapest, but Zen scored 9.4/10 in our most recent customer service poll. Go via our Zen* link and it'll waive the usual £19.99 set-up fee, so you just pay Zen's regular £29.99/mth over the 12mth contract.
Ends 11.59pm Thu 4 Mar.
Note: Some firms increase prices in line with inflation annually, so prices could change mid-contract. (1) To compare, we use 'equivalent prices' – adding all fixed costs, deducting any promo cash/vouchers and averaging over the contract.

Top deals: Superfast fibre broadband & line rental

If you're happy to pay more, you can get fibre with speeds from 55Mb. Let's make no bones about it, this is the luxury end of the market and isn't usually MoneySaving, but if you've a large family with many devices, or you're into streaming 4K content – or just impatient – this could be for you.

We've got our pick of the top superfast fibre deals for new customers of each firm below, but to find out what's available in your area and compare other options, try Broadband Unbundled, our broadband, phone line and TV comparison tool.

MSE analysis logo

Superfast fibre b'band (55Mb+) – what we'd go for

For us, our MSE Blagged deal with Virgin Media stands out. It's slightly faster than others in this speed category and available to 52% of households. If you go via our link, you'll pay £23.95/mth for broadband and line (incl weekend calls) over the 18-month contract, but you automatically get a £100 bill credit at the start of your contract, so there's nowt to pay for four months. That makes it £331.10 in total, equivalent to £18.39/mth.

If you're already with Virgin Media, or you want a provider known for top service, we've blagged a deal with Zen. It scored 9.3/10 in our latest service poll and has topped every poll we've done since 2017. Many tech websites also rave about its router, which they say makes its Wi-Fi more reliable, and its knowledgeable customer service staff. While you can pay less elsewhere, if good service is key, sign up via our link and it'll waive the usual £19.99 set-up fee, so you just pay Zen's regular £34.99/mth over the 12-month contract.

PROVIDER & AVG SPEED EQUIV COST (1) HOW IT WORKS
Virgin Media*
108Mb
MSE Blagged
Top pick
£18.40/mth Via our Virgin Media* link, you'll pay £23.95 for broadband and line (incl weekend calls), but you'll get a £100 bill credit automatically added to your account, so there's nothing to pay for four months. Factor that in and it's a total outlay of £331.10 over the 18mth contract, equivalent to £18.40/mth.
Ends 11.59pm Sun 28 Feb.

Vodafone*

63Mb

£19.62/mth

Go via this BroadbandChoices Vodafone* link and you'll pay £22.95/mth, but you'll be able to claim either a £80 Amazon, Tesco or M&S voucher. If you'd have spent that anyway, factor it in and the cost is equivalent to '£19.62/mth' over the 24-month contract. See how to claim.

Ends 11.59pm Mon 1 Mar.

Shell Energy*
63Mb
£20.83/mth Via our Shell Energy* link, you'll pay £24.99/mth, but you'll get a £50 automatic bill credit within 3mths. This makes it a total outlay of £249.88 over the 12-month contract, equivalent to £20.83/mth.
Ends 11.59pm Mon 22 Mar.
BT*
67Mb
£25.41/mth

Not the cheapest, but some users prefer a big name. Via this Broadbandchoices BT* link, it's £29.99/mth, but you can also claim a £110 prepaid Mastercard from BT, which is almost as good as cash. When factored in, it's equivalent to £25.41/mth over the 24-month contract. How to claim.

Ends 11.59pm Thu 4 Mar.

Zen*

66Mb

Top pick

£34.99/mth Not the cheapest, but Zen scored 9.4/10 in our most recent customer service poll. Go via our Zen* link and it'll waive the usual £19.99 set-up fee, so you just pay Zen's regular £34.99/mth over the 12mth contract.
Ends 11.59pm Thu 4 Mar.
Note: Some firms increase prices in line with inflation annually, so prices could change mid-contract. (1) To compare, we use 'equivalent prices' – adding all fixed costs, deducting any promo cash/vouchers and averaging over the contract.

Cashback sites may pay you for signing up

As an extra boon, members of specialist cashback websites can be paid when they sign up to some financial products. Do check that it's exactly the same deal though, as terms can be different. And remember the cashback is never 100% guaranteed until it's in your account.

Full help to take advantage of this and pros and cons in our Top Cashback Sites guide.

How to complain about your broadband provider

The broadband industry doesn't have the best customer service reputation and while a provider may be good for some, it can be hell for others. Common problems include installation dates not being met, limited service or slow speeds, incorrect billing and more. It's always worth trying to call your provider first, but if not then...

Resolver - free complaints tool

Free tool to help you complain

This tool helps you draft and manage your complaint. It's totally free to use, and it's offered by Resolver, a firm we work with to help people get complaints justice.

If the complaint isn't resolved, Resolver can escalate it to the free Ombudsman Services (or CISAS if you're complaining about Virgin Media).

Important: if your issue is about a voucher or incentive that was part of an MSE Blagged deal, then instead just let us know by emailing voucherhelp@moneysavingexpert.com as that's usually quicker.

Spotted out of date info/broken links? Email: brokenlink@moneysavingexpert.com