Stamp Duty Calculator

Use our guide to work out how much you'll need to pay

Stamp duty is a tax that's charged when you buy a property in the UK, but you'll only need to pay it if the price of that property reaches a certain threshold. Our stamp duty calculator below shows you just how much you'll need to pay. Plus, read our full guide for exactly how stamp duty works in different parts of the UK and when you need to pay it by.

What is stamp duty?

When you buy property or land, you usually pay tax on it. This is called stamp duty land tax in England and Northern Ireland, land and buildings transaction tax in Scotland and land transaction tax in Wales (though we'll use the generic term 'stamp duty' throughout this guide). 

For many years now, all UK nations have had a progressive stamp duty rate system. This means that instead of paying a single rate on the ENTIRE property purchase price, you might end up paying one rate on a certain portion of the property and a different rate on another.

Last year, the average stamp duty bill for homebuyers in England and Northern Ireland was more than £9,900.

Below we explain exactly how stamp duty works, or use our calculator above to see how much stamp duty you'll pay on a main property.

Stamp duty rates

Here's how the thresholds and rates differ across the UK nations.

Stamp duty rates in England and Northern Ireland

In England and Northern Ireland, no stamp duty is due on the first £250,000 of a residential property (provided it's your main residence and isn't a second home / additional property) – though that threshold is £425,000 if you're a first-time buyer.

Here are the stamp duty rates you'll pay on a main residential property:

Stamp duty rates (England & Northern Ireland)

PURCHASE PRICE MAIN RESIDENCE (1)
SECOND HOME / ADDITIONAL PROPERTY (2)
Up to £250,000 (£425,000 for first-time buyers) (3) 0% 3%
£250,001 – £925,000 5% 8%
£925,001 – £1,500,000 10% 13%
£1,500,001 + 12% 15%
(1) Rate applies to relevant portion of the purchase price. (2) This higher rate / surcharge does not apply if an additional property is bought for less than £40,000. (3) The £425,000 first-time buyer stamp duty threshold does not apply if the property you are buying costs more than £625,000 – if it does, the £250,000 threshold applies.

Quick question:

  • Who has to pay the non-UK resident stamp duty surcharge?

    Some people buying a property in England and Northern Ireland have to pay a higher rate of stamp duty because they are considered to be 'non-residents' of the UK.

    Non-resident status will apply if you do not spend at least 183 days anywhere in the UK (which can include Scotland, Wales) during the 12 months prior to purchasing the property. Do note that the rules are more complex if you're married.

    Where you have to pay the non-resident rate of stamp duty, it'll be equivalent to an extra two percentage points on normal stamp duty rates. 

    For example, a non-resident first-time buyer purchasing a property for £500,000 would pay:

    • 2% stamp duty (rather than 0%) on the property price up to £425,000.
    • 7% stamp duty (rather than 5%) on the property price between £425,000 and £500,000.

    For more information on how non-resident status works in relation to stamp duty, see the Gov.uk website.

Stamp duty rates in Scotland

In Scotland the official name for stamp duty is 'land and buildings transaction tax'.

The main difference between stamp duty in Scotland and England / Northern Ireland is the thresholds and rates that are used – though the Scottish system does have extra relief for first-time buyers, like in England and Northern Ireland.

Here are the stamp duty rates you'll pay on a main residential property:

Land & buildings transaction tax rates (Scotland)

PURCHASE PRICE MAIN RESIDENCE (1)
SECOND HOME / ADDITIONAL PROPERTY (2)
Up to £145,000 (£175,000 for first-time buyers) 0% 6%
£145,001 – £250,000 2% 8%
£250,001 – £325,000 5% 11%
£325,001 – £750,000 10% 16%
£750,001 + 12% 18%
(1) Rate applies to relevant portion of the purchase price. (2) This higher rate / surcharge does not apply if an additional property is bought for less than £40,000.

Stamp duty rates in Wales

In Wales the official name for stamp duty is 'land transaction tax'. 

The stamp duty thresholds and rates are different to those in England / Northern Ireland and Scotland, and there is no extra relief for first-time buyers. Here are the rates you'll need to pay:

Land transaction tax rates (Wales)

PURCHASE PRICE MAIN RESIDENCE (1)
SECOND HOME / ADDITIONAL PROPERTY
Up to £225,000 0%

4% (on the portion up to £180,000)
 

7.5% (on the portion between £180,001 and £250,000)

£225,001 – £400,000 6% 9%
£400,001 – £750,000 7.5% 11.5%
£750,001 – £1,500,000 10% 14%
£1,500,001 + 12% 16%

(1) Rate applies to relevant portion of the purchase price. 

Stamp duty for first-time buyers

It can be confusing to work out exactly how much stamp duty a first-time buyer needs to pay with the extra 'relief' available in England, Northern Ireland and Scotland.

Tick the first time buyer box in our stamp duty calculator above to see how much you'll have to pay. Crucially, though, please note that...

For the purposes of stamp duty, you WON'T be considered a first-time buyer if you've ever owned, or part-owned, a property in the UK or abroad. This includes if you've ever inherited a property – even if you sold it straightaway and never lived in it.

In England and Northern Ireland

There's no stamp duty for first-time buyers on the first £425,000 of a main residential property (provided the property you're buying costs £625,000 or less).

In Wales 

First-time buyers pay no land transaction tax on the first £225,000 of a property (this applies to all buyers of a main residential property).

In Scotland

First-time buyers pay no land and buildings transaction tax on the first £175,000 of a property.

Buy-to-let and second home stamp duty

Where you buy a property in addition to one you already own – for example a second home (or third, fourth, etc) – you'll need to pay a higher rate of stamp duty:

  • In England and Northern Ireland the higher rate of stamp duty is equivalent to an extra three percentage points on top of standard rates.

    For example, if you were buying a second home for £300,000, you would pay £11,500 in stamp duty, whereas if it was your only property (and you weren't a first-time buyer), you'd only pay £2,500.

  • In Scotland it's equivalent to an extra six percentage points.

    So, on a second property worth £300,000, you'd pay £22,600. That compares to £4,600 if the house you were buying was your only property (and you weren't a first-time buyer).
  • In Wales it's equivalent to an extra four percentage points.

    So, on a second property worth £300,000, you'd pay £16,950 in stamp duty. That compares to £4,500 if the house you were buying was your only property.

This higher rate also applies if you're buying an additional property with the intention of renting it out (this is known as buy-to-let).

But if you're buying your first property and intend to rent it out rather than live in it, you don't need to pay the surcharge, so standard stamp duty rates apply. However, you won't be eligible for first-time buyer stamp duty relief (available in England, Northern Ireland and Scotland) as this can only be applied to main residential properties.

When must I pay stamp duty?

If you're buying in England or Northern Ireland, you have 14 days from the date of completion/date of entry (when all the contracts are signed and dated, and you get the keys – read our Buying a home guide for a full timeline) to pay stamp duty.

In Scotland and Wales, you have 30 days

Take longer, and you could face a fine and possibly interest on top, so don't!

In reality, your solicitor will probably sort this out and push you to pay the bill straightaway – in fact, most tend to want their cash before completing the property purchase for you, just in case you then can't or don't pay them.

However, it's legally your responsibility to ensure your stamp duty/transaction tax is paid. If you are doing this yourself, click the questions to see the process.

  • How do I pay stamp duty in England and Northern Ireland?

    In England and Northern Ireland, stamp duty is paid to HM Revenue & Customs (HMRC). Where your solicitor doesn't do this for you, here's what you need to do...

    • Find your unique transaction reference number (UTRN). It's 11 characters long and found on your submission receipt if you have filed online, or on your paper stamp duty return.

    • Pay online or by mobile banking. Just as you might move money to a pal's account, you can transfer the money online or by mobile banking using HMRC's bank details. Bacs payments normally take three working days, so take this into account and don't miss the deadline, while CHAPS payments usually arrive on the same working day.

    • Other ways to pay. If you don't have online or mobile banking, you can pay by debit card (but not credit card), cheque or cash in most banks, or by cheque via the post.

  • How do I pay land and buildings transaction tax in Scotland?

    Again, your solicitor is likely to do this for you. Here you need to pay Revenue Scotland, and you have 30 days to pay up. If your solicitor doesn't do this for you, here's how you can do it yourself...

    • Submit an online return registering the transaction. You'll need to go to Revenue Scotland's site to do this. 

    • Find your transaction reference. It's 13 characters long, beginning with 'RS'. You can find it on the receipt for your online return.

    • Bank transfer (including via mobile banking). Just as you might move money to a pal's account, you can transfer the money online or by mobile banking using Revenue Scotland's bank details. You can use Faster Payments, Bacs or CHAPS. Remember, if you're using Bacs, the transfer could take three working days, so don't miss your payment date.

      For more information on how to pay stamp duty, see the Gov.uk website.

  • How do I pay land transaction tax in Wales?

    In Wales, land transaction tax is paid to the Welsh Revenue Authority. This is payable within 30 days of you completing on your property.

    If you have a solicitor, they'll usually file your return and pay the tax on your behalf if you ask them to and add the amount to the sum you pay them.

    If you need to pay land transaction tax yourself, here's how to do it...

    • First you need to submit a return registering the transaction. You'll need to go to the Welsh Revenue Authority's (WRA) site and submit a tax return registering the transaction. This can either be done online or via post.
    • Find your unique transaction reference number (UTRN). After you've submitted your return, you will not be given a UTRN immediately. It will be sent to you once your return has been processed by the WRA.

      If you've not got enough time to wait for your UTRN to be issued, you can instead use the following payment reference number: "Postcode of land \ surname of buyer". For example: "CF379EH \ Bloggs".
    • Bank transfer (including via mobile banking). Just as you might move money to a pal's account, you can transfer the money online or via mobile banking using the WRA's bank details. You can use Faster Payments, Bacs or CHAPS. Remember to include the reference (as explained above) in the payment reference section.

      If using BACS, the WRA must have your payment four working days before the payment due date, so that it can be processed.

Adding stamp duty to a mortgage

The simple answer here is that it's best that you don't, but many people find that they have to.

To add the cost of stamp duty to your loan means a bigger mortgage debt. So, say you needed a £180,000 mortgage to purchase a house costing £300,000, but wanted to add the stamp duty, you'd need to request borrowing of £182,500 (in England and Northern Ireland), then use your 'extra' deposit money to pay the stamp duty.

There are two main things to consider here. Firstly, as mortgages tend to be taken out over a long term (25 years or more), that's normally how long the stamp duty borrowing will last too. Over a 25-year term at a rate of 5%, that extra £2,500 borrowing will cost about £6,000 in interest, so it's vital to be aware of the cost.

Secondly, this could affect your loan-to-value ratio (LTV) – the measure of how much of a property's value you are borrowing. The most competitive deals require a maximum LTV of 60% – yet in the example above, adding the stamp duty would push you from 60% to almost 62%, so be careful – speak to a mortgage broker to see if it's the right decision.

Looking for more home-buying help? We've lots more guides…

Tip Email

FREE weekly MoneySaving email 

For all the latest deals, guides and loopholes simply sign up today - it’s spam free!

Spotted out of date info/broken links? Email: brokenlink@moneysavingexpert.com