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Small Claims Court

Settle consumer disputes legally

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Amy

Updated 18 Apr 2018

small claims court

The small claims court is the low-hassle way to take legal action for up to £10,000 against a firm or individual. But be confident you've got a case as you'll be stuck with the fees if you lose.

Whether you're stuck with faulty goods a shop won't refund or at a standoff with a builder who's botched your bathroom, this guide tells you how to make a claim, whether it's the best course of action, and how to max your chance of winning.

The small claims court is the low-hassle way to take legal action for up to £10,000 against a firm or individual. But be confident you've got a case before you start as you'll pay twice as much if you lose.

Whether you're stuck with faulty goods, a shop won't refund, or at a standoff with a builder who's botched your bathroom, this guide tells you how to make a claim, whether it's the best course of action, and how to max your chance of winning.

While every effort's been made to ensure this article's accuracy, it doesn't constitute legal advice tailored to your individual circumstances. We can't assume responsibility and don't accept liability for any damage or loss which may arise as a result of your reliance upon it.

What counts as a small claim?

There isn't such a thing as the 'small claims court'. It's actually just a procedure that some more simple cases (the rough rule is those that'd take less than a day to resolve) for under £10,000 go through.

The big advantages are you can apply online, they try to keep it as informal as possible and you don't need a lawyer. Plus some cases go undefended, which means you simply win without doing anything. Plus if you lose, any costs awarded against you are usually limited.

Small claims need-to-knows

Going to court should be a last resort

Don't rule out mediation

You can't guarantee a case goes to the small claims court

Consider an ombudsman or watchdog instead

Keep the claim below £10,000 in England and Wales (other limits elsewhere)

You don't need a lawyer

You can claim for things that have happened in the last six years (five in Scotland)

You could win by default

If they haven't got the money, suing won't help

You won't necessarily get the amount you've asked for - even if you win

Is your claim genuine?

Before doing anything else, step back and think about whether you have a genuine claim. If your claim gets to court the judge will be looking for the accuracy of your claim and more importantly whether or not you're telling porkies - including embellishments. If the judge finds that you are, then you're not going to win, so be honest with yourself.

Ask yourself the questions:
  • Have I been genuinely wronged?
  • Can I afford the process?
  • Is it worth it?

If the answer to all three of these is "yes", then, and only then, should you consider starting the small claim process. But before you do, check the How to Complain guide - have you been through all the stages of complaining in there first?

Quick Questions

I am not normally great with forms, should I do this?

Does this take a lot of time?

What can I make claims for?

You can make a claim to the small claims court for most breach of contract claims (but don't forget that winning is a different matter), but it will be judged based on the law.

How much will it cost?

Now the all-important question - how much money is this going to cost me? But before we start there is a key point to make...

If you win your case, it won't cost you anything

Here's how it works:

You do pay a fee upfront. But if you win, it won't cost you anything as you'll get the fees back. If you lose, you don't - so be realistic with your initial claim.

  • £25 - £410 Initial claim fee - to start your claim (when done online).

  • £40 Court allocation fee - to get the claim to the court (if claim is over £1,500).

  • £25 - £325 Hearing fee - paid if and when your case gets to court (when done online).

On benefits or a low income?

If you're on benefits or have a low income, you may qualify for remission of the fees - this is just a fancy way of saying that you won't have to pay the fees. But this won't stop the judge making an order that you pay the other side's expenses if you lose.

Can I claim expenses if I win?

If you win your case, you'll get the court fees back as well as the claim, and you can ask for certain expenses.

If you win, you can't charge fees for any legal advice to the defendant. So if you pay for legal advice, you're unlikely to get it back. This is why most claimants deal with a small claim without the help of a solicitor.

Expenses can be awarded against you if you lose

You shouldn't have the other party's lawyer's fees awarded against you - but you could find yourself paying certain expenses of theirs if you lose, and you won't get the court fees back. You'll have to pay within 14 days of the hearing, but you can ask for more time to pay the costs and anything else by instalments once the court has seen full details of your income, expenses, assets and liabilities. You could end up paying:

  • £90/day For loss of earnings or leave to attend a hearing, plus reasonable travelling expenses for each of the other side and any necessary witnesses they take along to court.

  • £750 If the judge gave them permission to get evidence from an expert, eg, having to get an expert to inspect a sofa for a fault.

Step-by-step help for making a small claim

Donít panic, this wonít end up like an episode of Judge John Deed. You donít even have to take an oath. But you will need to state that what you have put down is true, and telling porkies could land you in trouble. In fact, you might never even get all the way to the court.

Making a small claim is often just a case of filling in a claim form online or sending one to the court (although it's cheaper online). Sometimes, just the act of doing this will mean a company settles (assuming youíve got a decent case).

Prepare the case

It's important to prepare the case carefully. Don't forget the court has to be convinced by what you're saying.

New: Quicker way to resolve claims online

Below we explain step-by-step how to start a small claim using the old system - which although does have an online system - is very dated and means you have to fill out and post a paper form.

The new system works exactly the same as the process we have outlined below, the only difference is that everything is done through the online sytstem which you can access through the government portal. So for example, the claim and the particulars of the claim are all incorporated within the new digital system.

The new online service is able to recommend mediation services and if you don't go to court enables you to settle your dispute online.

However, as the new system is still being fully developed, if your claim is contested/defended, the new online system stops there for now and you will be sent the provisional notice of allocation and the directions questionnaire via email/paper by court staff. We will update this guide if this changes in the future.

Fill out the claim form

The below information all relates to the old online system and paper form you have to send off, if you still choose to go down this route, this is the procedure you will need to follow.

The real meat of your claim involves filling in a form called a Particulars of Claim (Simple Procedure Claim in Scotland). This is a statement telling your side of the story.

Start court action

You should send or take two copies of the claim form to the court where you want to start court action (any money claim must be issued at the County Court Money Claims Centre, other cases can be issued in the local county court), and make sure you keep an extra copy for your own records. You must also take or send the court fee.

The court will then stamp the claim form and in most cases serve it on the defendant. It will give you a document with the case number on it (called a notice of issue). If you want to serve it yourself, you can ask the court to give it back to you once it has been stamped.

Thinking of making a small claim? Share your experiences/complaints in the Small claims court forum discussion.

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