Over-65s' travel insurance

If you've booked a holiday but not got travel insurance yet, DO IT NOW, DON'T DELAY.  Half travel insurance's value is protecting you BEFORE travelling as that way you've cover in place if something happens and stops you from going, in addition to cover if you do travel – though no policy covers everything. We take you through what to watch out for, then give you our top-pick travel insurance policies.

What is travel insurance for over-65s?

The aim of travel insurance is to cover the cost of the unforeseen – such as illness, injury or theft of your belongings – while you're on holiday. It's also designed to cover you if you have to cancel your trip before you go, or if you need to return early due to an emergency.

While travel cover works in exactly the same way for all age groups, as you get older, insurers see it as an excuse to charge you more – the main thinking being that you're more likely to develop medical issues while on a trip. 

And while it covers a lot, travel insurance isn't designed to (and won't) cover every eventuality or every loss or inconvenience that you experience while on holiday. Read this guide carefully so you know what is (and isn't) covered.

What does travel insurance cover?

Sadly not all travel insurance is created equally, but you should expect an insurer to pay out for most of the below. 

However, the exact level of cover will vary by policy – so always check the terms carefully before you buy.

Good travel insurance should cover you for... 

Reason Typical examples 
Cancellation as you can't travel If you're made redundant, have to do jury service, fall seriously ill, test positive for Covid, suffer a bereavement or have a home emergency such as a fire, flood or break-in.
Medical costs whilst abroad If you fall ill overseas, including Covid, and require treatment – plus any travel costs if you need to be brought back to the UK for it. Though ALWAYS tell your insurer about any pre-existing medical conditions, or you won't be covered (see our Pre-existing conditions travel insurance guide for full help).
Cutting your trip short (curtailment) If an emergency happens that requires you to travel home early, such as death of a close relative. 
Baggage and personal belongings If any of your stuff is lost, stolen or damaged while you're away. Though there are often limits on the amounts they'll pay out. You may also have cover for this under personal belongings on your home contents policy.
Sports, excursions and other activities If you can't make use of your booked activities, though some policies only cover this if the provider went bust.
Personal liability If you accidentally hurt someone or damaged their property, such as spilling a drink and staining an expensive upholstered chair.
You catch Covid You're generally covered if you test positive for coronavirus before your trip or while on it.

MSE weekly email

FREE weekly MoneySaving email

For all the latest deals, guides and loopholes simply sign up today – it's spam-free!

Over-65s' travel insurance need-to-knows

Getting the right holiday cover is a much more arduous task as you age, as statistically you're more at risk of injury and illness. However, besides the extra cost, over-65s' travel insurance is just like cover for younger travellers, insuring against unforeseeable mishaps which may occur before your holiday starts or while you're away. Here are 12 things you should know.

  • If you've booked a holiday, do not leave arranging the insurance on the 'things to do' list, as you'll be taking an unnecessary risk. 

    This is because travel insurance doesn't just cover you while you're away – it also covers you for cancellation, events such as redundancy or an injury or death in the family, or anything else that might go wrong BEFORE you make your trip. You're also covered if you catch coronavirus shortly before your trip and can't go.

    So, always buying your travel insurance ASAB (As Soon As you've Booked a holiday).

    The same rule applies for a UK holiday, and we have a guide to help with arranging UK travel insurance

  • Knowing the age of the travellers is one of the key pricing details the insurers want to know to ensure you do not fall outside of its upper age limit.

    Fortunately, there are still many insurers who don't have an upper age limit, but it does depend on whether you choose an annual multi-trip policy or a one-off single trip policy.

    Insurers such as Direct Line & Churchill have an age limit of 74 for an annual policy but no upper age limit for a single trip policy. This is also a similar pattern for Leisure Guard, Sainsbury's, Virgin and the Post Office.

    We also found Avanti, CoverForYou, Saga and Staysure do not have an upper age limit for an annual multi-trip, or even single-trip, policy.

    So, if you are at the higher end of the age scale, it could be worthwhile to get an annual trip quote alongside a single trip quotation, as you're likely to get more quotes via the single-trip option. 

  • The thought of having to declare medical conditions can be daunting but travelling without making your insurer aware of any issues can result in any claim you make being rejected.

    Make sure you give a full and frank rundown of all the health problems you have, or have had, usually in the last five years.

    If you have, or have had, what insurers consider to be less serious conditions, such as mild asthma or high blood pressure which you're not receiving ongoing treatment for, you may still be able to get medical cover at the standard price.

    Just let the insurer know, even if you don't deem it particularly important, as many providers are taking a pragmatic approach as to whether to charge you more because of a certain condition via its own medical screening. This is especially true as each insurer will have its own list of conditions it deems as more serious.

    If your insurer doesn't know your medical history, any existing conditions – however minor – will likely be excluded and you could face a massive medical emergency or medical expenses bill if you become unwell. Insurers also need to know about medication, conditions or illnesses that can be linked to your existing condition.

    For example, an asthmatic who develops a chest infection (connected to being asthmatic) while on holiday will only be insured if they've told 'em about it.

    For much more, including tips, tricks and how to find the cheapest deals, see our Pre-existing conditions travel insurance guide.

  • All the policies in the tool in this guide will cover you if you or a family member can't travel as you test positive for Covid-19 or you get Covid overseas and have to pay medical bills or accommodation costs as you need to isolate.

    There are a few policies that go further than the rest, providing cancellation cover if you're unable to travel due to a change in the UK Government's travel restrictions.

    Try M&S Bank, Churchill, Direct Line and Aviva (with travel disruption cover). They all meet our normal minimum cover levels, and most go beyond.

    Though DON'T think of this as complete coverage, as there are still many scenarios you're not covered for. Examples include the Foreign Office advising against travel to your destination but you still travel (though this is VERY unlikely for coronavirus reasons), or you not being able to travel as you haven't got the right documents.

  • While choosing a travel insurance policy isn't rocket science, don't think you can buy cover without first giving it considerable thought.

    Like all insurance policies, there are a number of things that providers won't pay out for. Here are the most common:

    • Alcohol-related injury. You may be on holiday to unwind but if you are badly injured while you are more than just a little tipsy, your insurer is likely to reject your claim. The same goes for drugs. Insurers have different classifications of 'drunk', with some using blood alcohol limits, so check your policy carefully before you buy.

    • Medical conditions. Insurers will often cover you if you have existing medical conditions, but if you fail to tell your insurer and then need treatment for that condition, or a related condition, you won't be covered. You may also struggle to get a claim paid if you ignore advised medication or jabs needed to enter a country.

    • Dangerous sports. If you're going on an adventure holiday, or planning to take a winter sports break, you must get extra cover or a specialist policy. Taking to the Alps for a spot of snowboarding with just a basic travel insurance policy in your bag is a risk not worth taking. If you get injured you could end up paying £10,000s in medical bills.

    • Refused entry (to visiting country). No one wants their holiday to end before it begins, but most standard policies won't cover this type of scenario. Insurance policies have a list of scenarios they do cover (for example, theft, medical assistance).

      It's your responsibility to check your travel documents are valid and you meet the entry requirements. Always check the Foreign, Commonwealth & Development Office (FCDO) website for the entry rules of the countries you're visiting well before travelling and give yourself plenty of time to get your paperwork in order.

    • Unattended possessions. Travel insurance will cover your personal possessions when you're abroad but it doesn't mean you can be gung ho with your stuff. If you leave your items unattended and they are then stolen, your insurer will not pay for their replacement.

    • Travel to dangerous countries. The FCDO outlines which countries it deems are unsafe for travel. If you travel to a country on its list, your cover is likely to be invalid. Check out the FCDO's current travel advice for more.
    • The excess. This is the amount you have to pay towards any claim you make. For example, if you cancel a trip and are entitled to £3,000 back from your insurer but have a £500 excess, you will only receive £2,500.

      However, many travel insurance products have separate excesses for different sections of the policy. For instance, some providers may make you pay an excess on both stolen cash and luggage. So if your suitcase was nicked and your wallet was inside you would have to pay an excess on both.

      It's important to check all excesses so you know exactly what you will have to pay if you make a claim.
    • Private hospital treatment. Only some insurers will cover you, others won't, so double-check your policy – whether out of curiosity or if you need to make a quick decision on which to go to.

      Of those we asked, it was a mixed bag. For example, if you're overseas and know you need to go to hospital to check out a chest pain, LV says it would cover you in a private hospital, but not all the insurers we asked would.

      However, if you're in an emergency, for example, you've a ruptured appendix or had a serious accident and are taken to a private hospital by emergency services without your knowledge, you're more likely to be covered by insurance, though there is still a chance of rejection.

      If rejected and you're unhappy, you can always go to the Financial Ombudsman Service, which can arbitrate.
  • Insurers will classify your trip as 'European' or 'worldwide'. Worldwide is often further broken down to include or exclude the US, Canada, the Caribbean or Mexico. Selecting the option to include these countries increases the premium due to the high cost of medical treatment – particularly in the US – and possible repatriation.

    Annual European travel cover isn't just for Europe

    If you're travelling just outside Europe, you don't always have to select worldwide cover. Many insurers actually allow you to use their European cover in a handful of non-European countries too.

    If you're visiting Egypt, Morocco, Turkey or Tunisia, it's worth getting a quotation for European cover first and then checking the policy's geographical area definition to see if the country you're going to is included. The following insurers – Allianz*Insure and Go and Coverwise* – all class Egypt, Morocco, Turkey and Tunisia as Europe.

    It's also worth noting that not all insurers automatically include Spain (and the Balearic/Canary Islands) in their European cover – you may have to pay extra to include Spain if you plan to travel there.

    Check if the Foreign Office is advising against travel to your destination

    The Foreign, Commonwealth & Development Office (FCDO) has a list of countries which it feels are unsafe for travel. Usually, this covers areas where there's war, terrorism or other reasons not to travel, such as natural disasters or a pandemic.

    So, when you're booking, and in the weeks leading up to your trip, check the FCDO website for the latest on whether you'll be able to travel as things can change quickly. You should also see if the country you're planning to travel to has restricted entry – you can usually do this via its UK embassy website.

    If one or the other means you can no longer take your trip, see if you can rearrange it, or if the provider will give you a refund. 

    If you still want to travel (though note we're not encouraging you to do so), you'll need a specialist policy as standard insurers won't cover you, even if travel was allowed when you booked your trip.

    Try Battleface* or Staysure* (with its 'travel disruption extension' optional add-on). 

  • The free European Health Insurance Card (EHIC) and its replacement, the Global Health Insurance Card (GHIC), which has been sent to new applicants since 1 January 2021, entitles you to treatment in state-run hospitals in the EU at the same cost as a local would pay. So if they pay nowt, you pay nowt.

    The main difference since 1 January 2021 is that you'll NO LONGER be able to use your EHIC or GHIC in Norway, Iceland or Liechtenstein, as they're not part of the EU.

    An EHIC/GHIC should be seen as an extra to travel insurance, not a replacement. Travel insurance covers a far greater range of scenarios, as well as gives cover for cancellation, possessions, delays, repatriation, personal liability, and more. Plus, even using an EHIC/GHIC you may need to pay, and travel insurance will cover that (and often using the EHIC/GHIC means you don't pay the excess).

    How do I get a GHIC?

    The card is free so if a copycat site pretending to be the real thing advertises a fee (often about £35), run a mile. For full info and how to get it for free from the legitimate NHS site, read our Free EHIC/GHIC guide.

  • This varies depending on where you're travelling and for how long, but if you get an annual multi-trip policy you also have the added comfort of knowing you have cover in place no matter how many trips you go on in a year.

    For those 65 or under, our rule of thumb is: go away two or more times a year and annual policies are often worth it. And that logic can usually work up to age 75.

    Above that, annual policies get relatively more expensive, so then they usually only win if you go away three or four times a year or more. 

    However, it does vary, so it's always worth doing the maths yourself and comparing annual multi-trip and single-trip policies.

  • If you're travelling with your partner or family, you have two options: you can cover everyone under one policy, or each person takes their own.

    If you're the oldie in a group and you're travelling with your younger partner or your family, it can work out cheaper for you to get a policy for yourself and for the rest to get a single, couples or family policy. This is because the price is usually based on the oldest traveller in the group, but always check both options before buying.

    When travelling with your family, a policy would normally only cover your immediate family, for example, partner and kids, so check exactly who is covered prior to committing. Even children going on a school trip may be covered automatically on a family policy (as long as they're with a responsible adult).

    There are times when separate policies will be a better option (so always check, to be safe), including:

    • If one of the travellers has a medical condition, as it will increase the price for all.
    • If just one of the travellers is going outside Europe, in particular to the US, or on a skiing trip (or even both), it could be better to have separate policies rather than the whole family buying extended cover when it's not needed.
  • Many bank accounts that charge a monthly fee have extra benefits such as travel insurance, so if you pay for yours you may already be covered for family members under 80 (depending on the account).

    This is great for those aged up to 79, who pay no surcharge on top of the monthly fee – though remember a surcharge may be applied if you're covering medical conditions that aren't covered as standard.

    If you think you got insurance as a sweetener with your bank account, check the terms to see if it's appropriate for your trip. For more info on accounts that offer travel insurance, see our Top packaged bank accounts guide.

    Do NOT confuse this with a benefit offered with credit cards called travel accident insurance, which only covers accidents on a train, plane or in a hire car paid for on the card. Never think this means you're completely covered. 

    And travel accident insurance should also not be confused with Section 75 legal protection – which covers you if you buy anything that costs between £100 and £30,000 using a credit card (not a debit card). See our Section 75 guide for more.

  • For either, do not expect to be automatically covered. For example, most regular travel insurance policies will only cover you for loss or theft of goods and medical costs while you're on a cruise. You may NOT be covered for other eventualities unless you upgrade your policy. These include:

    • Missed departure
    • Unused cruise excursions, for instance, a day trip to a city port
    • Cruise itinerary change
    • Cabin confinement, for example, onboard virus

    To get cover for these, you can usually select an add-on to get the right protection – which won't break the bank. If you want to buy one, a quick way to get a quote is to use a comparison site such as  MoneySupermarket*Confused.com*Gocompare or Compare The Market.

    Another one to try is Compare Your Cruise Insurance* where you select the cruise operator - including the ship and cruise - and the month of sail to get a quote.

    The same principle also applies if you're planning a skiing holiday – you'll need an add-on.

    Quick questions

    • Many holidaymakers wrongly assume they're automatically covered for winter sports as part of their travel insurance. While some providers offer winter sports as standard under certain policies, others only cover you if you extend your insurance and this will typically cost extra.

      All winter sports policies will cover you for skiing and snowboarding and many will also cover other activities, such as husky dog sleigh riding and sledging, as standard. If you are doing something a bit more unusual, such as ski jumping or snowmobiling, check the terms and conditions of your policy first. If you are planning to take part in something even more wild – such as luging or stunt skiing – specialist providers such as BMC and Snowcard may be able to offer you cover.

      If you opt for a specialist travel policy, check your details closely to make sure you know the limits of your cover.

      Don't forget to pick your specialist provider like any other insurer. Make sure you tell it about any existing medical conditions and remember to pack your EHIC/GHIC if you're going somewhere in Europe.

    • The cost of medical bills if you get injured on the slopes can be extortionate, so it's essential to have the right cover.

      The Association of British Insurers told us one Brit required £90,000 of treatment for a fractured rib and punctured lung.

      Even a smaller injury, such as knee ligament damage, cost as much as £3,800 to treat.

      Add being airlifted from the mountain to hospital, repatriation if you need to be flown home injured from the US or Canada, and this would significantly increase the claim.

      As well as covering yourself, winter sports insurance also covers your ski pack – a term used to describe the package of lessons you've paid for, lift passes and equipment hire – and cancellation of your holiday.

    • In most cases, you'll be allowed to ski off-piste but with certain restrictions. You'll have to be within the boundary of the resort, on a marked ski run, with local ski patrol guidelines or supervised by a qualified instructor.

    • Lucky you. It may be cheaper to take out an annual policy with a winter sports add-on. However, check the price against the cost of single trips to ensure you're getting a bargain. Your age is likely to play a part here so check the T&Cs of the policy carefully.

    • Most winter sports policies will cover you for accidental damage, theft or loss of equipment. The onus will be on you to keep your gear safe, so don't leave it at the mercy of crooks.

      Your equipment will usually be covered but different providers offer different limits. The sum insured is usually in addition to your standard baggage cover. For example, Axa will cover up to £1,500 worth of equipment, Admiral will cover from £500 up to £1,000 (depending on the policy), while Aviva and Direct Line give cover up to £500. Think about the value of your stuff and pick your policy accordingly.

      If you've hired ski equipment, it may be covered by your insurer if it's lost, stolen or damaged. Some providers insure any rented kit as part of your baggage up to a certain limit; others only pay up to 50% of the sum insured for hired equipment. Some ski equipment providers may also cover their gear for you, so it's worth checking with the resort before buying your cover.

      Alternatively, if you've paid for a full ski pack – including ski school fees, a lift pass and hired ski equipment – in most cases, this will be covered. The amount can range from £150 to £500, but can be as high as £5,000. As always, check your policy for any potential exclusions.

    • If your piste closes (usually due to lack of snow or an avalanche) and you're unable to hit the slopes, your insurer may give you back a set amount a day. This can range from £10 to £50, up to a limit of £200 to £500.

    • As long as your claim is valid and you're within the terms of your policy, you should be covered should you have a mishap on the slopes. But if you've had a drop of sherry and then injure yourself, your claim is likely to be rejected.

      This is a standard exclusion on most travel insurance policies, including ones with winter sports cover. Insurers have different classifications of 'drunk', with some using blood alcohol limits so check your policy before you buy. The same goes for skiing despite weather warnings and – with some providers – skiing without a helmet.

  • Even if you think you've found an all-singing, all-dancing policy that covers for every eventuality, beware. There's often a clause built in that says the policy won't cover 'recoverable costs', which essentially means you need to prove that you can't claim back those amounts elsewhere.

    So you'll usually need to put in the legwork and ask the provider, for example, the airline, holiday operator or car hire firm (and in some cases the credit card company), for a refund before your insurer would even consider a claim under the travel insurance policy. It's also worth noting that many insurers consider a credit note to be satisfactory, and may not pay out if one has been offered.

    Here's an example we found on Direct Line's site (but most insurers will have similar wording): 

    Before contacting us to make a claim please take the following steps:

    • Speak to the provider of your trip to understand if a refund is available, including a credit note or a voucher.
    • If you booked your trip using a credit or debit card, you should speak to your card issuer for advice on whether you can claim a refund from them. This is only applicable if you paid more than £100 for the trip and the service you have paid for isn't available, for example, the hotel is closed so you can't stay there as planned.

    We cannot log a claim until you have tried to recover costs from elsewhere where that option is available.

How to get cheaper travel insurance if you're over 65

Now you have read the 12 things you should know, here are some quick wins, and a recap, on how it can be possible to cut the cost of travel insurance, without losing out on cover.

1) Don't presume the country you are visiting is outside of Europe – insurers may not think so. If you're travelling just outside Europe, you don't always have to select worldwide cover. Many insurers actually allow you to use their European cover in a handful of non-European countries too. We have more on this above in case you missed it.

2) Check if an annual policy is cheaper than multiple single-trip policies. If you're planning to go away on 2+ trips, an annual policy could be cheaper than multiple single-trip policies – but it does depend on where you're going, for how long, and what you're doing (for example, a cruise or skiing). So it's always worth doing the maths yourself and comparing annual multi-trip and single-trip policies.

3) Tweak the excess. Increasing the excess can help to get the cost down, but will mean any pay-out will be reduced by the insurer if you were to claim. It is also worth knowing that the excess usually applies to each person claiming – so can add up.

4) Are you already insured? Check if you already have cover via your bank account.

5) And, do you really need to pay extra for the add-ons? Insurers usually charge you more if you want to cover your gadgets (check if your home insurance already covers you for this), to remove the excess, or even to up the limits. It might not make a massive difference, but why pay more if it's not necessary?

Cheapest single-trip travel insurance for over-65s

These are our cheapest top-pick policies for individuals and families looking for single-trip travel insurance, split into three categories:

Cheapest 'no frills' travel insurance

These are the cheapest regulated policies that we could find that meet our minimum cover criteria. We judge them purely on price, NOT feedback. So these are for those not too fussed about the risk and just see it as a backstop. It's worth noting you may be covered for some delays (UK/EU flight delays has full info) and lost gadgets under your home insurance (do check).

Cheapest single-trip travel insurance policies for over-65s

  TABLE_CELL_STYLE Europe Worldwide   TABLE_CELL_STYLE
Insurer One week, individual One week, couple One week, individual One week, couple Excess
Coverwise (Bronze)* £21.52 £40.10 £53.58 £137.23 £100
Avanti (Classic)* (i) £24.06 £44.38 £81.14 £132.93 £75
Staysure (Comprehensive)* (i) £24.27 £40.88 £82.27 £182.97 £99
Leisure Guard (Flexi Bronze) £24.48 £39.12 £83.36 £138.94 £100
Admiral* £26.36 £46.81 £88.73 £157.56 £100
A to Z Insurance (Standard) £27 £44.25 £95 £143.75 £75

Correct as of January 2024. All prices will vary depending on your age – prices above based on 66-year old travellers.
(i) Important. You must have had all the Covid vaccinations offered to you by the NHS to be covered for any claims relating to Covid, unless medically exempt.

Well-rated policies with higher claim limits

We know travel's nowhere near as easy as it used to be and many are willing to pay more for greater peace of mind. So we've a few 'premier' travel insurance policies to try with higher levels of cover. All the policies here exceed our normal minimum cover levels and give:

  • £5,000 cancellation cover per person
  • £10 million medical and repatriation expenses per person
  • £2,000 baggage cover per person
  • Travel disruption, for instance, volcanic ash, tsunami or other natural disaster

Well-rated single-trip travel insurance policies for over-65s

  TABLE_CELL_STYLE Europe Worldwide   TABLE_CELL_STYLE
Insurer One week, individual One week, individual Excess
ABTA Travel Insurance (Gold)* £47 £124.36 £50
LV (Premier)* 
with optional baggage cover
£52.30 £173.27 £50 to £90

Correct as of January 2024. Prices vary depending on age & number of people insured – prices above based on a 66-year old. 

For a wider choice – with good options to add on cover – try comparison sites

If our hand-picked selection of insurers don't provide the cover you're looking for, it's worth doing a full check using comparison sites such as MoneySupermarket*Compare The Market, Confused.com*Gocompare and Quotezone*. They allow you to adjust your quote to suit your needs, for example, if you need to add cruise cover and want to compare policies.

However, we can't filter these for you, so always check they have cover that meets your needs. In particular, if are looking for an annual cover policy, and you choose to use a comparison website for a holiday over a year away, check if the insurer will cover your holiday, as not all do.

Important. These sites are independent of MSE and may include providers we wouldn't.

Cheapest annual travel insurance for over-65s

These are our cheapest top-pick policies for individuals and families looking for annual travel insurance, split into three categories:

Cheapest 'no frills' travel insurance

These are the cheapest regulated policies that we could find that meet our minimum cover criteria. We judge them purely on price, NOT feedback. So these are for those not too fussed about the risk and just see it as a backstop. It's worth noting you may be covered for some delays (UK/EU flight delays has full info) and lost gadgets under your home insurance (do check).

Cheapest annual travel insurance policies for over-65s

  TABLE_CELL_STYLE Europe Worldwide   TABLE_CELL_STYLE
Insurer  Individual Couple   Individual  Couple
Excess
Admiral* £37.09 £61.36 £103 £170.38 £100
Leisure Guard (Flexi Bronze) £66 £99.47 £108.42 £189.90 £100
Avanti (Classic)* (i) £70.80 £125.83 £180.39 £329.66 £75
Staysure (Comprehensive)* (i) £70.94 £144.65 £194.85 £356.08 £99
A to Z Insurance (Standard) £83.25 £131.75 £195.75 £301.25 £75
Top annual travel insurance via fee-charging bank accounts. These could be cheaper than those above, especially for couples making a worldwide trip, but could require you to open a new current account.
Virgin Money Club M £12.50/month rolling cost (£150/year) with cover up to your 75th birthday. It also includes UK breakdown cover, gadget and mobile phone insurance. £50

Barclays Travel Pack
£14.50/month rolling cost (six-month minimum term, so min £87, or £174/year) with cover up to your 80th birthday. It also includes European breakdown cover. You need a Barclays current account to add this on.
£50
Co-op Everyday Extra £15/month rolling cost (£180/year) with cover up to your 80th birthday, excluding winter sports. It also includes European breakdown cover and mobile phone insurance.  None

Correct as of January 2024. All prices will vary depending on your age – prices above based on 66-year old travellers.
(i) Important. You must have had all the Covid vaccinations offered to you by the NHS to be covered for any claims relating to Covid, unless medically exempt.

Well-rated policies with higher claim limits

We know travel's nowhere near as easy as it used to be and many are willing to pay more for greater peace of mind. So we've two 'premier' travel insurance policies to try, which exceed our normal minimum cover levels and give at least:

  • £5,000 cancellation cover per person
  • £10 million medical and repatriation expenses per person
  • £2,000 baggage cover per person
  • Travel disruption, for instance, volcanic ash, tsunami or other natural disaster  

Well-rated annual travel insurance for over-65s

  TABLE_CELL_STYLE Europe Worldwide   TABLE_CELL_STYLE
Insurer Individual Individual Excess
LV (Premier)* 
with optional baggage cover
£133.75 £394.46 £50 to £90
ABTA Travel Insurance (Gold)* £241.60 £331.09 £50
Top annual travel insurance via a fee-charging bank account. This covers you and your partner up to your 80th birthday, but requires you to open a new current account. 
Co-op Everyday Extra £15/month rolling cost (£180/year) with cover up to your 80th birthday, excluding winter sports. Includes European breakdown cover and mobile phone insurance. £0

Correct as of January 2024. All prices will vary depending on your age – individual prices above based on 66-year old travellers. 

For a wider choice – with good options to add on cover – try comparison sites

If our selection of insurers don't provide the cover you're looking for, it's worth doing a full check using comparison sites such as MoneySupermarket*Compare The Market,  Confused.com*Gocompare and Quotezone*. They allow you to adjust your quote to suit your needs, for example, if you need to add cruise cover and want to compare policies.

However, we can't filter these for you, so always check they have cover that meets your needs. In particular, if are looking for an annual cover policy, and you choose to use a comparison website for a holiday over a year away, check if the insurer will cover your holiday, as not all do.

Important. These sites are independent of MSE and may include providers we wouldn't.

Still can't get cover or not happy with the price?

Specialist brokers can help you find insurers that cover non-standard trips, or help you if medical conditions mean you're struggling to find an affordable policy. To find one, see the British Insurance Brokers' Association website.

Always double-check the level of cover offered before taking out a policy as well as providers' websites for any info about coronavirus. Your broker should also be able to help you with any questions you have.

How to claim on your travel insurance

Claiming on your travel insurance shouldn't be daunting and – if you understand the terms and the excesses on your policy – you shouldn't be in for any nasty shocks. 

Follow the five steps below in the event you need to claim...

  • Submit your claim as soon as possible. Contact your insurer as soon as you can. Some parts of your policy may have a short window to submit a claim and it may take a while to be processed.
  • Get your insurer to accept a medical claim before you get treatment. If you need to make a medical claim – and it's not an emergency – get your insurer to accept the claim over the phone first, before getting treatment. For example, if you sprained your ankle, call your insurer – if it accepts the claim then, you're less likely to be faced with a rejected claim later down the line. For obvious reasons, don't delay treatment if it's an emergency.
  • Notify the police if it's a theft. If something goes missing or is stolen when you are abroad you may need to get a crime reference number or the overseas equivalent to make a successful claim. Report the incident to the police as soon as you can – you often have to do so within 24 hours – to make sure your claim doesn't hit the skids.
  • Keep receipts. If you are claiming for lost luggage or delay, remember to keep receipts of essential items you have bought while waiting, such as food and drink. Many insurers allow you to add these expenses to a claim and may ask for receipts as proof.
  • Complain if you feel your claim was unfairly rejected. If your insurance company rejects your claim, and you think it has done so wrongly, don't take it lying down. Complain to the free Financial Ombudsman. This independent adjudicator will make the final decision on a claim if you are locked in a dispute with your insurer. For more on how to make a complaint, read our Financial rights guide, or see our section below.

How to complain about your insurance provider

The insurance industry doesn't have the best customer-service reputation and while a provider may be good for some, it can be hell for others.

Common problems include claims not being paid out on time or at all, unfair charges, or exclusions being hidden in small print. It's always worth trying to call your provider first, but if not, then…

Spotted out of date info/broken links? Email: brokenlink@moneysavingexpert.com