Cheap personal car loans

Borrow at 5.9% for £7.5k+

Personal loans are one of the cheapest ways to buy a car – and that's even considering that their rates have doubled in the past 18 months. So if you know what you're doing, you can go straight to our Loans Eligibility Calculator to find the lenders that are most likely to accept you. Or, if you need more help, our full guide will show you how personal car loans work, whether other car finance would work better, and the best-buy loans.

Not the car finance option you were looking for? Check these out...

Personal Contract Purchase | Hire Purchase | Car leasing | Also see: Compare loans

What is a personal loan?

Personal loans, also known as unsecured loans, are where you borrow a sum of money from a lender, and agree to pay it back over a set period of time, in fixed monthly repayments.

If you're buying a new or used car and NEED to borrow (for example, your car is a wreck and must be replaced yet you don't have enough in savings to cover it and can't wait until you would) a personal loan can be a cheap way to do so, as rates are currently close to all-time lows. 

Once you've found a car you want to buy, you'll know the amount you want to borrow. Ideally this should be based on the price of the car minus any amount you have in savings to contribute, minimising the amount you need to borrow.

The lender will charge you interest as its fee to lend money to you, so you repay the amount you borrowed plus interest. The advantage is you get cash upfront, but can spread the cost of a purchase over time – you usually repay over a period of one to five years.

The fixed interest rate you get will depend on how much you want to borrow and other factors such as your credit score. Note that these rates are 'representative examples', meaning only 51% of successful applicants have to get the rate that's advertised. So you could apply and be offered a more expensive rate.

We list the cheapest rates below and our eligibility calculator will show you not only which loans you've the best chance of getting, but for some it'll reveal whether you'll get the advertised rate, in your own personal best-buy table.

Once you're accepted for a personal loan to buy a car, the cash is usually deposited into your nominated bank account, so you're then able to transfer the money over to the dealer to pay for your vehicle. You can drive away that day as the new owner of that car.

Pay just a penny with a credit card to get greater protection

If the seller accepts credit card, pay even a penny towards the car on it and you'll get powerful Section 75 protection (provided the car costs between £100 and £30,000). The credit card provider is then jointly liable with the car dealer should anything go wrong, so means it should be a lot easier to sort out any issues with the car further down the line.

What happens at the end of the loan?

Once you've made all the repayments, that's it. The lender marks the loan as settled on your credit file, and you have nothing left to pay.

Alternative types of car finance to consider

This guide focuses on personal loans, though before you go on, do check these alternative types of car finance to assess if they'd suit you better. 

Broadly speaking, there are six different ways to pay for a car. The table has the key differences at a glance, before we run through the alternatives to a loan in more detail.

Comparing ways to finance a car purchase

Finance type Typical length of agreement? Initial deposit required? Who owns the car? Mileage restrictions?
None – cash savings N/A N/A You No
0% credit card Up to 23 months No You (though you'll still need to repay the debt) No
Personal loan Usually 1 to 7 years No You (though you'll still need to repay the debt) No
Personal Contract Purchase Usually 1 to 5 years Yes (i) The finance company, unless an optional final balloon payment is made Yes (ii)
Hire Purchase Usually 1 to 5 years Yes (i) The finance company, until the final repayment is made, then you No
Leasing/Personal Contract Hire Usually 1 to 4 years Yes (i) The finance company, at all times Yes (ii)

(i) In most circumstances, though sometimes you can get a deposit contribution from the dealer or structure a lease deal to pay nothing upfront. (ii) You'll usually agree an annual mileage limit with the finance company at the start of the deal & will pay additional fees if you are over this when handing back the car.

Sadly, there's no 'one-size-fits-all' answer to which way of financing a car is best (as much hangs on whether you want to own the car and other factors). However, we've included more information on each alternative to a personal loan below, to help work out which is right for you.

  • Cash savings – the cheapest option for most cars

    The clear winner if you want to own the car fully from day one, as you'll avoid paying any interest or taking on debt. Though if you're looking to buy a brand new car – which on average loses about 40% of its value by the end of the first year – and are likely to change it in the next few years, it's worth considering leasing or a Personal Contract Purchase deal. With these, the overall cost of ownership can work out cheaper.
  • 0% spending credit card – no interest if you can get a big enough credit limit (and the dealer accepts cards)

    Depending on the price of your new car, a 0% spending credit card could be the next cheapest way to borrow. You'll own the car outright (like paying in cash) plus you'd be covered by Section 75 protection. However, you'd need to check whether the car dealer accepts payment by credit card, as not all do.

    Unfortunately you usually won't know what credit limit you'll get before applying, and you should budget to pay the debt off before the 0% period ends, as the interest rate rockets after then. The longest cards typically offer up to 23 months at 0% – see our 0% spending cards guide for more information.
  • Hire Purchase (HP) – an option if you're struggling to get a cheaper loan, though the lender owns the car until you've made all the repayments

    This works in a similar way to a loan – as you're borrowing and paying off the full cost of the car – though here you won't own it until you've made the final payment. Instead the car is owned by the finance company as it uses it as security against the loan (like a mortgage), so if you fail to pay, it can seize the car.

    This security can mean an HP deal will be easier to get than normal loans, though you'll usually need to pay a deposit (often 10% or more of the car's price). You'll therefore need to consider how to fund that.

    Like with PCP above, the dealer will be making money from the finance deal, so it may offer larger discounts or contributions to the deposit on new cars. For used cars, this may mean you can haggle some money off. Always be careful to calculate the total cost you'll need to repay taking into account all interest. This will show the 'true' value of the discount. See our Cheap Hire Purchase guide for more.
  • Personal Contract Purchase (PCP) – can be good if you want a new car every few years, but often more expensive overall than a loan

    This is a popular way to get a new car, especially if you frequently change vehicle and want to pay for it monthly. It's basically a loan, though usually cheaper each month as you won't be paying off the full value of the car. You also won't own it at the end, unless you choose to.

    You'll pay a deposit and then monthly instalments over a set term. There's usually a mileage allowance, but provided you stick to that and don't damage the car, you can either return it and walk away at the end of the agreement, or pay what's known as a 'balloon payment' to own it.

    As the dealer will be making money from the finance deal, you may find it offers larger discounts or contributions to the deposit on new cars. For used cars, it may mean you can haggle more off the sale price. Always be careful and make sure to calculate the total cost you'll need to repay after all interest has been added. This will then show the 'true' value of the discount. See our full guide on cheap Personal Contract Purchase for more information.

Car rent.
  • Car leasing/Personal Contract Hire (PCH) – low monthly rental payments, but you'll never own the car (nor have the option to)

    This is a way to get a brand new car for a monthly payment, though this is essentially a long-term rental, so you'll never own the car – nor have the option to buy it. Instead you'll pay an initial deposit followed by a monthly amount for the duration of the contract, which is usually over one to four years.

    As with PCP, you'll need to choose a mileage allowance (for example, 8,000 miles a year) and you're responsible for the car's upkeep. At the end of the agreement, you simply return the vehicle (though you could be charged if you've exceeded the mileage or damaged it). See our Cheap car leasing guide for full help.

Where can I get a loan?

If you're looking for a loan for a car, check out the best-buy rates below, though remember, the advertised rate isn't necessarily the one you'll be offered. Up to 49% of people accepted for the loan could be given a different – usually higher – interest rate. The rate will also depend on your credit score, with the cheapest often for those with better scores. 

We list loans by 'bands' as the rate you could get differs depending on how much you want to borrow. 


Cheapest loans under £3,000

As we warn above, while you should only borrow what you NEED, a peculiar quirk means you can sometimes pay less by getting a slightly bigger loan. Rates of loans under £3,000 are the most expensive, so always check if it's actually cheaper to borrow slightly more.

Important. For loans up to £5,000 you could be much better off using a money transfer credit card if you can repay the full balance over 9-12 months.

Cheapest loans £1,000 - £1,999

LENDER RATE 
(1-5 years or stated)
CHECK ELIGIBILITY + APPLY
Representative rate. At least 51% of those accepted must get this rate, others can be charged more.
Santander 13.5% rep APR  Check eligibility
Apply*
M&S Bank 14.9% rep APR (1-7 years) Check eligibility
Apply*
Sainsbury's Bank 16.8% rep APR Check eligibility
Apply*

Cheapest loans £2,000 - £2,999

LENDER RATE
(1-5 years or stated)
CHECK ELIGIBILITY + APPLY
Representative rate. At least 51% of those accepted must get this rate, others can be charged more.
Santander 13.5% rep APR Check eligibility
Apply*
M&S Bank 14.9% rep APR (1-7 years) Check eligibility
Apply*
Novuna Personal Finance £2,500-£2,999: 15.9% rep APR (2-5 years) Check eligibility
Apply


Cheapest loans £3,000 - £4,999

Cheapest loans £3,000 - £4,999

LENDER RATE
(1-5 years or stated)
CHECK ELIGIBILITY + APPLY
Representative rate. At least 51% of those accepted must get this rate, others can be charged more.
M&S Bank 9.9% rep APR (1-7 years) Check eligibility
Apply*
Santander  9.9% rep APR Check eligibility
Apply*
Novuna Personal Finance £4,000-£4,999:11.2% rep APR (2-5 years)
Check eligibility
Apply


Cheapest loans £5,000 - £7,499

Cheapest loans £5,000 - £7,499

LENDER RATE
(1-5 years or stated)
CHECK ELIGIBILITY + APPLY
Representative rate. At least 51% of those accepted must get this rate, others can be charged more.
Santander 7.3% rep APR Check eligibility
Apply*
Tesco Bank 7.3% rep APR
Must have a Clubcard
Check eligibility
Apply*
Sainsbury's Bank 7.4% rep APR
Must have a Nectar card
Check eligibility
Apply*


Cheapest loans £7,500 - £15,000

Cheapest loans £7,500 - £15,000

LENDER RATE
(1-5 years or stated)
CHECK ELIGIBILITY + APPLY
Representative rate. At least 51% of those accepted must get this rate, others can be charged more.
TSB 5.9% rep APR Check eligibility (i)
Sainsbury's Bank 6% rep APR
Must have a Nectar card
Check eligibility
Apply*
Tesco Bank 6.1% rep APR
Must have a Clubcard
Check eligibility
Apply*

(i) This provider has asked us to link only to our eligibility calculator. | See all official APR examples.


Cheapest loans £15,001 - £20,000

Cheapest loans £15,001 - £20,000

LENDER RATE
(1-5 years or stated)
CHECK ELIGIBILITY + APPLY
Representative rate. At least 51% of those accepted must get this rate, others can be charged more.
TSB 5.9% rep APR Check eligibility (i)
Sainsbury's Bank 6% rep APR
Must have a Nectar card
Check eligibility
Apply*
Tesco Bank 6.1% rep APR
Must have a Clubcard
Check eligibility
Apply*

(i) This provider has asked us to link only to our eligibility calculator. | See all official APR examples.


Cheapest loans £20,001 - £25,000

Cheapest loans £20,001 - £25,000

LENDER RATE
(1-5 years or stated)
CHECK ELIGIBILITY + APPLY
Representative rate. At least 51% of those accepted must get this rate, others can be charged more.
TSB 5.9% rep APR Check eligibility (i)
Tesco Bank 6.1% rep APR
Must have a Clubcard
Check eligibility
Apply*
Sainsbury's Bank 6.1% rep APR
Must have a Nectar card
Check eligibility
Apply*

(i) This provider has asked us to link only to our eligibility calculator. | See all official APR examples.


Cheapest loans over £25,000

Important. Certain lenders offer personal loans up to £50,000, though it's a huge commitment, so think very carefully before getting such a large amount. Be VERY sure you can repay it. 

If you do plan to borrow, first check with your own bank, as cheap rates for such large borrowing are often for existing customers only. If your bank can't help, next look at the cheapest open market rates.

1. You need to be an existing customer to qualify for these loans

LENDER RATE
(1-5 years or stated)
APPLY
Representative rate. At least 51% of those accepted must get this rate, others can be charged more.
First Direct
£25k-£30k: 6.4% rep APR (1-8 years) Apply 
(not in our eligibility calc)
£30k-£50k: 7.9% rep APR (1-8 years)
NatWest/RBS/Ulster Bank £25k-£35k: 7.9% rep APR (1-8 years) Apply to NatWest, RBS or Ulster Bank
(not in our eligibility calc)
£35k-£50k: 9.9% rep APR (1-8 years) Apply to NatWest, RBS or Ulster Bank
(not in our eligibility calc)

2. The top open market loans over £25,000

LENDER RATE
(1-5 years or stated)
APPLY
Representative rate. At least 51% of those accepted must get this rate, others can be charged more.
Sainsbury's Bank £25k-£40k: 7.8% rep APR (2-7 years)
Must have a Nectar card, not open to anyone self-employed
Check eligibility
Apply*
Tesco Bank £25k-£35k: 7.9% rep APR (1-7 years)
Must have a Clubcard. 
Apply*
(
not in our eligibility calculator) 

If the above doesn't work, you could combine smaller personal loans or remortgage, though that usually means extending the term, more interest and securing the debt on your home.

What are the pros and cons of borrowing money for a car?

Getting a personal loan for a car comes with both advantages and disadvantages. It's important to think about your financial situation, goals and priorities before deciding to take on debt. Here are some pros and cons to think about:

The pros of personal car loans

  • You own the car immediately. Taking out a personal car loan means you can pay for the vehicle outright and become the owner straightaway, even though you're spreading the cost over a period of time. As the owner you'd be able to drive and modify the car as you like, which wouldn't be the case with some other forms of car finance, which may involve a mileage limit, for example. 
  • Flexibility. Personal car loans typically come with various repayment terms, allowing you to choose one that suits your needs and your budget. For example, longer terms can lower monthly repayments, but may mean more interest.
  • Potentially access a wider range of vehicles, support and options. Financing could allow you to consider a newer – and potentially more reliable – vehicle. You may get the benefit of a warranty and after-sales support if you buy from a dealer, and could customise the car to meet your own spec if you buy brand-new, though always factor in depreciation if doing this.
  • Boost your credit score. Making timely payments on a car loan can positively affect your credit score by demonstrating your ability to manage credit responsibly. This will increase your chances of getting finance in the future.

The cons of personal car loans

  • You could pay significant interest. Borrowing money comes with interest payments, which increase the total cost of the car. Bear in mind that the longer the loan term, the more you will pay in interest. 
  • It's a BIG commitment. Taking on a personal loan to buy a car is a financial commitment that ties up a portion of your income for an extended period. Unexpected life events or financial difficulties can make it challenging to meet monthly payments, so ensure you budget carefully.
  • You need a good credit score. Without a good one, you may not get a decent interest rate and could be rejected for a personal car loan altogether. That said, this is a risk when applying for other types of finance too. See our Credit scores guide for full information on how to check yours for free, including tips to boost it.
  • The possibility of repossession. If you fail to make payments, the lender may repossess the car. This is not only stressful in itself, but can have serious consequences for your credit score and financial stability.

Before getting a personal loan to buy a car, carefully assess your financial situation, consider the alternatives, and weigh the long-term impact on your budget and financial goals. It's crucial to compare loan terms and interest rates and to fully understand the terms and conditions of any prospective loan agreements.

Can I be rejected for a personal car loan?

Car loan application form. Personal details. Source of income.

Yes, you can be rejected for a personal car loan. That's because a personal car loan really is just a regular unsecured personal loan, so the same rules and procedures apply.

You'll be credit-checked, and if the lender deems you uncreditworthy – in other words, it thinks you're at higher risk of defaulting on the payments – it'll reject you.

A lender will primarily consider your credit rating and credit history to evaluate your 'creditworthiness'. A bad credit score, a backdrop of late payments or a high level of existing debt may result in a loan rejection, as could not earning enough to cover the costs or your employment history being unstable.

Other reasons you might be rejected for a personal car loan, aside from having bad credit, include providing incomplete or inaccurate information on your loan application, trying to borrow too much money and not meeting the lender's specific criteria.

Personal loan vs car finance: Which should I choose?

Whether a personal car loan or more traditional car finance is right for you depends on various factors, including your preferences, financial situation and long-term goals. Below is an overview for each option:

Personal car loan

With a personal car loan, you own the car outright from the beginning. Plus, you have the flexibility to compare lenders to find the best interest rate that you can access. And there'll be no mileage restrictions either, unlike with leasing, allowing you to drive as much as you want without additional costs.

That said, monthly payments can be higher compared with some car leasing options, while you also bear the full brunt of the car's depreciation since you own it from the start.

Car finance

More traditional car finance encompasses car leasing, Hire Purchase and Personal Contract Purchase. These generally involve lower monthly payments than personal car loans, as well as a smaller down-payment. Because of this, you may be able to afford a swankier car than you would if you bought one outright. 

However, not only are the overall costs likely to be higher, but, depending on the type of car finance you opt for, you might not own the car until the final payment is made. In addition, buying a car on finance typically involves mileage restrictions and additional charges if you were to exceed them.

So which is better?

There is no one-size-fits-all answer – the 'better' option depends on your individual preferences and financial situation. If owning the car outright is essential to you and you plan to keep it for a long time, a personal car loan is likely preferable. On the other hand, if you prefer lower monthly payments and the option to drive a newer car more frequently, car financing could be a better fit.

How do personal car loan repayments work?

So, you've got the money from your lender and bought your car: how exactly do the loan repayments work?

  • You'll pay in monthly instalments. The majority of car loans are paid back in monthly instalments. How much these cost depends on factors including the overall loan amount, the interest rate and the loan term. The lengthier the loan term, the less you'll pay each month, but the longer you'll be doing so for, and the more interest will build up.
  • You should set up a Direct Debit. Life is hectic, and it's easy for car loan repayments to slip your mind. But this can come back to bite you. Not only will missing a loan repayment harm your credit score, but potentially result in additional interest and late payment fees too. The simple solution to this? Setting up a Direct Debit. This way, you'll never have to worry about manually transferring money to the lender.
  • You'll pay interest – known as APR. APR stands for annual percentage rate, which is the amount of interest charged on the loan agreement, plus any associated fees. The rate you'll pay is dependent on aspects such as the lender, how much you're borrowing and your credit score. Learn more about APRs in our Interest rates guide, and check out some examples of the kind of rates offered in the best-buy rates section above. 
  • You might be able to save by switching loan. Sometimes it's possible to save on interest by switching loan provider mid-term, if you can find another lender out there offering a better rate. However, you'll likely have to factor in an early repayment charge – see below – so to help, our loan cost calculator can show you if it's worth switching. 
  • You may want to pay off the loan early. If you've got the funds, an early loan repayment could save you paying significant interest. This typically involves an early repayment fee, which is usually based on one or two months' APR. This would still work out less than paying interest on all of the remaining payments, providing you're not near the end of your loan term.

What other costs should you consider when buying a car?

Of course, loan repayments aren't the only costs involved in buying and using a car. From fuel or electricity costs to car insurance, there's lots to consider when working out how much a car will cost you overall.

Here are the main expenditures to take into account:

  • Fuel. You won't get far without fuel – quite literally. According to consumer research site NimbleFins, the average driver spends £1,225 a year to fuel a petrol car and £1,572 to fuel a diesel. What you'll end up spending in reality depends on factors such as how much you drive, how fast you do so and even where you fill up your tank. If your car's fully or part-electric, you'll have to consider the cost of charging it, although there are specific electric vehicle tariffs out there which can sometimes be cheaper.
  • Insurance. As a minimum you need third-party motor insurance to drive legally in the UK, though many will want a higher level of cover to protect in case of damage to their own vehicle. The average car insurance premium is £900 a year – so use our Compare+ Car Insurance tool to find the cheapest policy for you. Some may also want the peace of mind of breakdown cover, which comes as a separate cost, or often can be accessed through a packaged bank account, which can provide value for money for some.
  • MOT and servicing. Passing the Ministry of Transport test – commonly known as an MOT – is a legal requirement for all cars more than two years old. MOT tests are capped at £54.85 for cars, however, it's possible to get them much cheaper. Any repair costs will be over and above the initial MOT fee. Plus, servicing is a further additional cost, but doing this regularly can ensure the health and longevity of your vehicle. 
  • Maintenance. Speaking of servicing, it's unlikely that your car will only require repairs on MOT day. Of course, how much you spend on maintenance throughout the year depends on the number of issues that crop up, and the nature and severity of them. Some minor repairs may be covered by your breakdown cover (if you have it). Plus, you'll also need to replace consumable parts such as tyres, batteries and wiper blades, for example.
  • Road tax. You must pay road tax – also called car or vehicle tax – to use public roads. Its cost depends firstly on the age of your car, and then on factors such as engine size, fuel type and CO2 emissions, although some vehicles don't require tax at all. You'll also need to pay a different rate for a year if you're registering a new car for the first time. Learn more about road tax at Gov.uk.

Other costs you'll need to think about when buying a car include parking, tolls and other road charges such as the congestion charge.

Looking for tips to cut motoring costs?

Read our Motoring MoneySaving guide for ways to reduce driving spend while staying safe and legal on the road.

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Personal car loans Q&A

  • What factors can affect my loan amount and repayments?

    The amount you'll be able to borrow will vary between lenders, with factors such as your income and credit history used to determine how much a lender will offer you (if at all).

    Before comparing loans, always check your credit history to make sure there are no mistakes and all the information is correct. There are also easy things you can do to improve it if it's not in a great shape. See Check your credit report for free and how to improve your credit score for full help and top tips. 

    You can then use our loans eligibility calculator to see your chances of acceptance for many lenders. You can then play around with the amount you're looking for, plus the length of time you want to repay it to see how that changes your results.

    A longer term will mean lower monthly repayments, however you'll pay more in interest over the course of the loan. Always aim to repay debt as quick as you can, to minimise the cost as much as possible.  

  • How can I make repayments as low as possible?

    For this, find the loan with the lowest interest rate possible.

    You can also lower the monthly payment by borrowing less – so paying a larger deposit from savings if you're able to – or by choosing to take the loan over a longer time period. Do this and your monthly payment will be lower, though you'll pay more interest overall.

    Another way to lower payments is to choose a cheaper car; the cheaper the car, the cheaper the repayments.

  • What if I want to pay off my loan early?

    You can do this at any time. Some lenders allow you to do it penalty-free, but most will charge you a fee, of between one and two months' interest.

    To settle a loan early, call your lender and ask for a 'settlement figure'. This is the amount you have to pay to completely clear the loan.

  • What happens if I miss a payment?

    If you miss a payment, it's likely the lender will contact you to see what's wrong. If you keep missing payments, it'll mark you 'in default', which will appear on your credit file, likely preventing you from getting any further credit.

    If you find you're not able to make repayments, always contact the lender – ideally before the next payment is due. If it knows you're struggling, it should help you by offering an alternative and affordable repayment plan.

    If you don't let it know, and continue to miss payments, the lender can take you to court. This could involve anything from asking the court to allow bailiffs to come and take your car (or other assets you own to the value of the car), or in the worst case, ask the court to make you bankrupt over the debt.

  • Do I get Section 75 cover with a loan deal? If not, do I have any protection?

    No. Personal loans aren't covered under Section 75, as the lender pays the money to you, so there's no creditor-supplier relationship between the lender and the car dealer. However, if you're able to pay even a part of the car's cost using a credit card, you would be covered, even if you then used a loan to pay the rest.

    If you have a complaint about a car bought using a personal loan, try to resolve it with the dealer. It has obligations under the Supply of Goods Act which means that it needs to make sure the car it's supplying is fit for purpose, as described and lasts a reasonable length of time.

    Unfortunately though, there's less protection if you're using the loan to buy a used car from a private individual. See Buying a used car for what consumer protection rules apply.

  • Will I be credit-checked?

    Yes. When you apply, the lender will credit-check you to work out whether to trust you to pay it back.

    Likewise, if you fail to keep up repayments, this could leave a mark on your credit file, which could affect your ability to get a mortgage or other credit. See our Credit scores guide for more info.

  • What if I need to borrow more than they'll lend?

    Once you've applied for the loan, it's already on your credit report. So assuming you applied for the cheapest loan for you, there's no point in rejecting the money as it's not the amount you need. 

    You may be able to apply for another loan elsewhere to fill the gap, though the new lender will take your loan into account when deciding, and may decide that you can't afford the extra borrowing.

  • What if there's a problem with the car?

    If you buy a car using a loan and realise it's faulty, you'll need to take it back to the dealer, and ask it to repair the problem. The dealer has a responsibility under the Consumer Rights Act to ensure the car is as described and fit for purpose.

    If there's something obviously wrong with the car, avoid taking delivery. If the fault develops later, contact the dealer and ask for a repair or replacement.

    However, if you've bought from a private seller, you've fewer rights, so ensure you take the car for a test drive before committing to buying it. Our Buying a used car guide can help with what you should be looking for.

  • What will happen if UK interest rates change?

    Almost every personal loan is at a fixed rate, so the rate and repayments you are given at the outset are fixed over the life of the loan, regardless of what happens to the base rate (the Bank of England's official borrowing rate). So there's no impact whatsoever, whether rates rise or fall.

    But a change in the base rate will affect those looking to get a new loan, although it's not an exact relationship. As loans are borrowed over the long term, the rates lenders set depend more on the City's predictions of long-term interest rates rather than the actual UK base rate.

  • How quickly will I get the money?

    This depends on the lender. If it's an online loan application, which you can sign digitally, you could have the cash within a couple of hours. 

    If you need to wait for the lender to send documents in the post, it could take up to a week.

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