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British Gas to take on Robin Hood Energy's 112,000 customers – here's what you need to know

British Gas to take on Robin Hood Energy's 112,000 customers – here's what you need to know

British Gas is set to take on all 112,000 customers supplied by Robin Hood Energy, after a buyout was agreed. If you're with Robin Hood Energy, here's what you need to know.

Following an agreement, Robin Hood Energy's 112,000 domestic customers will be moved to British Gas over the next few months as Nottingham City Council, which created Robin Hood Energy five years ago, is selling the firm. British Gas will also take on the firm's 2,600 business energy customers.

Customers of Ebico Energy and a range of smaller regional suppliers, which provide energy under Robin Hood Energy's supply licence – known as a 'white-label' agreement – will also become British Gas customers.

These are Angelic Energy, Beam Energy, Citizen Energy, Ebico, Fosse Energy, Great North Energy, The Leccy, RAM Energy, Southend Energy, White Rose Energy, and Your Energy Sussex.

If you're with Robin Hood Energy, or one of these white-label suppliers, don't worry – your supply won't be interrupted, and British Gas says that all customers will be offered a British Gas tariff at the same or a lower price than the one they're currently on.

The 112,000 customers from Robin Hood Energy will join British Gas's existing five million domestic energy customers.

Sadly, the announcement also means 230 jobs are at risk as Robin Hood Energy ceases to operate.

I'm a Robin Hood Energy customer, do I need to do anything?

At the moment, you don't need to do anything, and your supply won't be interrupted – British Gas says that it will be contacting all Robin Hood Energy and its white-label customers over the next few weeks to explain how they will be moved over to British Gas.

Robin Hood Energy says it will take a few months to move over all customers, and until it does you can continue to use the normal Robin Hood Energy contact details.

If you're with Robin Hood Energy, you likely won't notice any real changes, as it's mostly happening behind the scenes. You should still be able to log on to your online account as you do now, and the contact details will stay the same.

Will I be charged more for my energy?

British Gas has confirmed it will honour all fixed deals, so if you're on a fixed tariff your rates will either be the same or possibly lower until the end of your current deal.

If you're on a variable tariff, British Gas has said it will either match or beat it.

I'm in credit, will I get this back?

If you're a Robin Hood Energy customer and your account is in credit, you'll keep this. Your credit will simply be transferred to your new account under British Gas.

You're then free to use it to cover future energy use or ask for it back, in line with British Gas's refund rules.

I don't want to move across to British Gas, can I switch?

You're free to switch away if you don't want to be with British Gas, but Robin Hood Energy has recommended that customers wishing to switch away now should wait until their new British Gas account has been set up.

If you do decide to switch away before your new account is set up by British Gas, any credit owed to you might take longer to reach you, according to Robin Hood.

If you're on a variable tariff, you're free to switch penalty-free. If you're on a fix and your existing tariff has exit fees, you'll still be charged these unless you're in the last 49 days of your deal.

You can do a quick full-market comparison via our Cheap Energy Club to check you're on the best deal for you.

What do British Gas and Robin Hood Energy say?

Chris O'Shea, chief executive of British Gas owner Centrica, said: "We are pleased to be able to offer every customer moving to British Gas a tariff which means their price will not be any higher and, importantly, they will be supplied with green electricity and have access to a range of other benefits."

David Mellen, leader of Nottingham City Council which owns Robin Hood Energy, said: "Given the current economic climate and the further levels of investment needed to enable the company to compete in an extremely difficult market, [the council] concluded that a sale was the right option."