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Credit Card Rewards

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Sam | Edited by Martin

Updated August 2016

Best credit card rewardsThe top credit card reward schemes pay you £2 for every £100 spent on them, an easy way to make £100s or £1,000s a year just by changing plastic. Yet some use impenetrable points systems to disguise poor payouts.

This guide intensively analyses every major scheme to calculate the best buys for frequent flyer points, cash, and more.

How long will these cards last? This guide is fully up to date. However, there is a chance some card firms could cut rewards in future, as the EU has capped the charges providers can levy on shops each time you use their plastic, which funds rewards. Capital One, RBS, M&S and Tesco Bank have already cut rewards for some customers. So enjoy the perks while you can.

How reward cards work

The premise is simple. Spend on one of these cards and they pay you - some of these cards even pay you cashback. Do it right and you can earn £100s worth of goodies each year, at no cost. If you're debt-free and pay off every month, you might as well get paid to spend.

It sounds great - everyone loves something for nothing. But unless you're careful, cards will actually deliver nothing for something, as there are a couple of major holes to watch for.

The reason cards give rewards is to encourage spending, as do that and they can charge us 15% interest or more and retailers up to 0.3%. So always follow…

Golden rules (need-to-knows)

Getting charged interest almost always dwarfs even the very best reward schemes, so quite simply…

If you want rewards, always set up a direct debit to repay the card in full each month, so there's NO interest.

Sadly, some card providers deliberately miss the 'repay in full' option off their direct debit forms. If so, just write 'pay off in full' and send it in. It should be honoured, but call to check.

It's also worth watching for any annual fee. These are now rare, and everyone except very high spenders should avoid any card with one. The cost isn't usually recovered by the extra rewards.

  • Can't repay in full every month?

    If you're not sure you can always repay the card in full, then DON'T pick a card for rewards. Focus on a card with a lower interest rate instead. - see the 0% Credit Cards guide.

    0% Credit CardsAs applying for any financial product has a minor credit score impact (see the Credit Scores guide), if you have existing credit card debts, it's also worth prioritising making them cheap before going for rewards by doing a balance transfer.

  • Don't believe the hype

    Some schemes are focused on making people think they're earning large, when actually payouts are pretty paltry. To what extent depends on the type of scheme.

    • Rewards schemes

      Here you earn days out, flights, holidays or more by getting points - and that's where the problems start, as Martin points out...

      "Martin Lewis, site founder and editorFor a TV programme stunt I was once asked to design a credit card that looked good, but contained hidden, abysmally anti-consumer traps. Many signed up to my fake MACS card (SCAM backwards), which promised TWELVE points per pound spent.

      "Most people didn't ask what the points were worth. In fact, they were worth 0.0001p. In other words, nothing. And 12 nothings… is nothing.

      "It's this lack of transparency that allows reward schemes to create a magical 'something for nothing' mystique. A Sainsbury's Nectar point is worth up to 1p compared to a Tesco Clubcard point worth up to 4p, so one Clubcard point is worth almost four times more than the Nectar points.

      "That's what this guide focuses on; a mathematical evaluation of every scheme to pick the real winners."

    • Cashback or cash-lite cards

      With cashback cards you earn cash each time you spend, and it's then usually paid once a year as a lump sum (see the Top Cashback Cards guide). The main advantages are you know exactly what you're getting and can spend the rewards anywhere.

      Cash-lite schemes are where money earned can be converted into gift vouchers or can only be spent in a specific store, eg, M&S.

  • Grab credit card freebies

    Many credit cards offer incentives such as free flights or electronic goods for you to sign up to the card. Therefore if you've a good credit score, just take advantage by signing up even if you don't want the card. A full list of what's available is in the Credit Card Freebies guide.

Best buy credit card reward schemes

These results are based on evaluating over 40 schemes, calculating the actual value of the rewards for spending. This is done by first number-crunching what an individual point's really worth, then how many points you get when you spend.

The rewards are measured in percentages. So a 1.5% reward means you get an average £1.50 worth of points for each £100 spent.

Unless stated, all cards were judged on annual spend of £10,000; very achievable if you lump all your normal spending on it. Plus it incorporates annual fees and unless noted, introductory bonus points. We've separated the top deals into categories.

Top cashback cards Top cashback

This is the top cashback card currently available. This card has a big intro bonus. For full options see the Top Cashback Cards guide.

amex

Highest paying fee-free card but you need to spend big to win

Amex Plat Everyday* - 5% for 3mths then up to 1%

If you want to earn cashback while spending but don't want to pay for the privilege of doing so, then this fee-free card from American Express* pays new cardholders a massive 5% intro cashback for the first three months. And after three months, the amount of cashback you'll earn depends on how much you spend, but you can earn up to 1%.

Need to knows
  • You earn 5% for the first three months (max spend £2,000).
  • Overall you need to spend at least £3,000 in the year to receive cashback.
  • After the intro period, you earn 0.5% cashback on spending up to £5,000/year.
  • All spending above £5,001 in a year will earn 1% cashback.
  • Make sure you repay in full EVERY month to avoid the 22.9% representative APR, or interest will quickly wipe away the cashback gains.
Eligibility Calculator
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Stats box
  • Representative variable rate: 22.9% APR (see Official APR Example)
  • Cashback: 5% in the first three months (max £100), then up to 1% after
  • Annual fee: None
  • Min income: N/A
  • Max cashback/year: None
  • Cashback expiry: N/A
amex

Consistent top cashback rate but you need to pay to get the card

Amex Platinum* - 5% for 3mths then up to 1.25%

This American Express* Platinum Cashback card is different to the card above because it pays up to 1.25% cashback, and lets you earn slightly more with your intro bonus. But while the higher rate is a plus, there is a £25 annual fee which wipes away some of the gain - and if you happen to spend less than expected, you'd still be hit with the fee, making this card less profitable than the Amex card above.

Need to knows
  • You earn bonus 5% cashback for the first three months (max spend £2,500).
  • After the intro offer's over, you'll automatically be put onto the tiered spending rates: £0 to £10,000 gets 1% cashback (the initial £2.5k spend counts towards this). All spending above £10,001 gets the full 1.25% cashback.
  • Ensure you pay off in full every month, or you'll be charged 22.9% interest which'll quickly wipe out any cashback gain. The easiest way to repay in full is to set up a direct debit.
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Stats box
  • Representative variable rate: 28.2% APR spending is 22.9% (see Official APR Example)
  • Cashback: 5% in the first three months (max £125), up to 1.25% after
  • Annual fee: £25
  • Min income: N/A
  • Max cashback/year: None
  • Cashback expiry: N/A

Airmiles

Airline credit cards and rewards

There are a variety of different schemes, but part of the choice depends on which airlines you prefer and their availability, as often the big gain comes from using credit card points along with points from frequent flying.

Watch out for taxes and charges, as all reward schemes make you pay these on top. In some cases (especially if you're travelling within Europe) it might be cheaper to fly with a budget airline instead of paying for the tax on top of using your Avios points. Read the Cheap Flights guide to see if you can get cheaper flights. We've only listed the top fee-free card but you can earn more airline rewards with other cards which charge a fee. Frequent flyers read the Airline Credit Cards guide for all our top cards.

BA

Top fee-free card if you like to travel plus free companion flight at £20k+ spend

BA Amex*

If you fancy yourself as a bit of a jet setter then the British Airways Amex* card can reward you with free flights. Plus, if you're accepted you can get 9,000 bonus Avios points. But you need to be quite flexible with your dates as seats can be limited. You can also get a 'free' companion ticket if you spend £20,000/yr on the card.

Need to knows
  • You'll earn 1 Avios point per £1 spent on the card.
  • Spend £1,000 within the first three months and you'll get the bonus 9,000 Avios points.
  • Spend £20,000/year, and you get one free 'companion ticket' when booking a flight. The free ticket can be used to get the same ticket type as the cardholder (if you go first class, so do they), though only on BA. But you'll still need to pay taxes and charges on top.
  • Compare other frequent flyer cards in the Airline Credit Cards guide.
  • See more ways to Boost Your Avios Points.
Eligibility Calculator
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Stats box
  • Representative variable rate: 22.9% APR Official APR example
  • Annual fee: None
  • Reward scheme: BA Miles (Avios points)
  • Points per £100: 100
  • Taxes included? No
  • Points' expiry: Three years after you collect your last. Can I buy extra miles?

Supermarket loyalty

Some cards only give rewards, vouchers or cash for certain retailers or when spending in a particular store. They can be useful if you're a creature of habit, and like to do your weekly shop at the same place every week.

amex

Get M&S Rewards while you spend

M&S*

If you're a die-hard M&S shopper, this could be the ideal card for you. This M&S* credit card gives reward points when you spend anywhere, though you get five times more points if you spend at M&S.

Need to knows
  • You'll also get a voucher for 500 bonus points sent with your card. To access these points, take the voucher and the card and use them on a purchase in M&S. You'll then get the 500 points, equivalent to a £5 voucher.
  • You'll earn one point for every £1 spent in M&S stores and one point for every £5 elsewhere. One point is equivalent to 1p, and will convert into vouchers every three months.
  • After 25 months, you'll be charged 18.9% representative APR if you don't pay the card off in full.
Eligibility Calculator
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Stats box
  • Representative variable rate: 18.9% APR (Official APR Example)
  • Annual fee: None
  • Reward scheme: M&S points
  • Value of one point: 1p
  • Points' expiry?: Points for two years
  • Points per £100: 100 in M&S; 20 elsewhere
tesco

Good if you're a die-hard Tesco shopper, plus long 0% on spending

Tesco Clubcard 5pts for every £4 spent in Tesco

If every week you're at your local Tesco doing the food shop then it may be worth paying for that shopping on the Tesco Clubcard credit card as it gives you extra clubcard points on top of the normal points you'd normally collect.

Need to knows
  • Earn one Clubcard point for every £8 spent, or 1 point per £4 if shopping in Tesco (plus the 1 point per £1 you get with a standard Clubcard).
  • One point is worth 1p if spent instore at Tesco, but boosts to up to 4p if redeemed for some of Tesco's special Clubcard Rewards vouchers. These can be used for a huge array of mainly entertainment-based treats.
  • There's also up to 28 months 0% on spending, which means you only have to pay the minimum balance each month and you won't be charged interest. But after the 0% period ends you must repay the card in full or you'll be charged 18.9% rep APR (some poorer credit scorers could get up to 23.9%)
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Stats box
  • Representative variable rate: 18.9% APR (Official APR Example)
  • Annual fee: None
  • Reward scheme: Tesco Clubcard Points
  • Value of one point: Up to 4p on Rewards, 1p instore
  • Points per £100: Up to 25
  • Points' expiry: Points for two years, Rewards vouchers for an extra six months
Sainsburys Credit Card

Boost for Sainsbury's shoppers plus 0% on spending

Sainsbury's Nectar* 2 pts per £1 spent in Sainsbury's

If you prefer to shop at Sainsbury's then the Nectar Purchase* credit card gives you a boost on the Nectar points you earn when shopping there.

Plus you'll get 27 months 0% on spending, so you won't have to repay the full balance each month, and you won't be charged any interest. But only do this if you are disciplined and will save the money so you can fully repay at the end of the 27 months.

Need to knows
  • New customers applying by 27 September 2016 will get 5,000 bonus Nectar points if they spend £800 in Sainsbury's in the first three months - but don't use this as an excuse to spend more than you normally would.
  • You will get two Nectar points for every £1 you spend in Sainsbury's, or one Nectar point for every £5 elsewhere.
  • You can redeem the points with other retailers in the Nectar scheme, such as PizzaExpress, Argos, eBay, Eurostar and more - and in some cases the point value increases.
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Stats box
  • Representative variable rate: 18.9% APR Official APR Example
  • Annual fee: None
  • Reward scheme: Nectar points
  • Value of one point: 0.5p
  • Points per £100: Up to 200
  • Points' expiry?: None unless account is closed
tesco

Up to 1% back in Waitrose/John Lewis vouchers

John Lewis/Waitrose 1 point for every £1 spent here

Similar to the cards above you earn points each time you spend on the Partnership credit card. But you'll earn John Lewis/Waitrose vouchers instead - so perfect if you like to shop in either one of those stores.

Need to knows
  • You earn one point for every £1 spent in John Lewis/Waitrose and one point for every £2 spent elsewhere.
  • The points are converted into vouchers three times a year and can be spent at John Lewis, John Lewis Direct (online) and Waitrose.
  • Always pay off the card in full every month, or the rewards points are wiped by the 16.9% representative APR.
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Stats box
  • Representative variable rate: 16.9% APR (Official APR Example)
  • Annual fee: None
  • Reward scheme: Partnership points
  • Value of one point: 1p
  • Points' expiry?: Points for two years
  • Points per £100: 100 in John Lewis/Waitrose; 50 elsewhere
amex

0.5% back in vouchers, though shopping at Asda can earn you 1%

Asda Money* 1% cashback

The Asda Money* card offers reasonable rewards, especially if you're an Asda shopper. However, while this cad describes itself as a cashback card, the cashback can only be redeemed as vouchers which you need to spend at Asda.

Need to knows
  • Earn 1% back on all shopping done instore and online, or on Asda fuel. All other spending attracts 0.5% back.
  • Once you've accrued £2.50 worth of 'cashback' you can go online and convert it into an Asda voucher.
  • You'll be charged 18.9% representative APR if you don't pay the card off in full at the end of each month.
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Stats box
  • Representative variable rate: 19.9% APR (see Official APR Example)
  • Cashback: Vouchers equivalent to 1% in Asda, 0.5% elsewhere
  • Annual fee: None
  • Min income: £10,000 household income
  • Max cashback/year: None
  • Cashback expiry: N/A

'Close to cashback' deals

Some reward cards give you points on all of your spending. These can come close to cashback cards as they offer the ability to spend points earned in a wide variety of places.

Amex Preferred Rewards Gold Card

Spend £2,000 and get £100 back in vouchers, fee waived in the 1st year

Amex Gold*

Surprisingly, this is a charge card, not a credit card. But if you're accepted for the Amex Preferred Rewards Gold* card, and spend £2,000 within the first three months, you'll get a bonus 20,000 rewards points, equal to £100 in vouchers.

Need-to-knows
  • Because it's a charge card, you HAVE to pay it off each month, there's no credit facility.
  • If you don't pay it off, you'll get a £12 late fee, and a mark on your credit file.
  • The card usually has a £140 annual fee, but for now is fee-free in the first year. To avoid paying £140, diarise to cancel before year two starts.
  • You earn 2 points per £1 spent directly with airlines or in a foreign currency and 1 point per £1 spent on day to day spending.
  • You can convert your points into vouchers for Amazon, M&S, Homebase, House of Fraser, PC World and more, though retailers vary.
  • You can also now use your points to pay off purchases, effectively working as cashback. However, you receive slightly less than you'd get exchanging for vouchers; 1,000 points gives £4.50 'cashback' vs £5 in vouchers.
  • Alternatively, you can convert them to frequent flyer or hotel scheme points and add them to your current stash.
  • Amex says that you get the points as soon as you hit the spending trigger, though they can take up to a month to arrive in your card member account.
  • Always carry a back up card, as Amex isn't accepted everywhere, especially in a lot of smaller retailers.
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Stats box
  • Cashback: Vouchers equivalent to up to 1% (plus 20,000 bonus points)
  • Paid out: Monthly
  • Max 'cashback'/year: Unlimited
  • Min spend: £2,000 for bonus | Card issuer: Amex
  • Annual fee: No fee in year one, but £140 from year two onwards
  • Min income: N/A
Key questions

What rewards can I get from this card? We've analysed how much you might get back from different levels of spending...

Annual overall spend £3,000 £5,000 £10,000 £20,000
Points earned, incl bonus 24,500 27,500 35,000 50,000
Converting to vouchers £100* £125* £175 £250
Assumes 50% of spending on air travel & abroad and 50% elsewhere
* = doesn't use the entire points total

How can I further boost points? You get a 10,000 points bonus on the anniversary of taking out the card if you've spent more than £15,000, but remember if you keep the card into a second year, you'll pay the £140 annual fee.

You can also boost your points by getting a supplementary card (for a partner/friend), whose spending will then earn points. The first card is provided free, though any more will cost £45.

Plus, if you have a friend who has the card, get them to recommend you, and both you and they get 2,000 bonus points.

intu Credit Card

Up to £60 in Intu gift cards during the first year

MBNA Intu

The MBNA Intu card gives rewards in the form of gift vouchers for Intu shopping centres, so could be a good option if you live near one. You can get up to £60 in vouchers in the first year if you can spend £5,000 on the card. But, after you've had the card a year, you can only get £20 in vouchers in subsequent years, so consider cancelling if better alternatives are available.

Need-to-knows
  • You earn a £20 gift card if you spend £250 on the card within 90 days.
  • In the first year, you earn a further £20 when you spend £3,000 (including the initial £250) and another £20 when you spend £5,000.
  • After you've had the card a year, rewards drop in subsequent years. You'll earn £10 when you spend £3,000 and another £10 when you spend £5,000.
  • You'll be emailed a code within 60 days of hitting a spend threshold, which you must redeem for a gift card with customer services at an Intu shopping centre within 90 days.
  • Gift cards can be spent at any of 15 Intu shopping centres and are valid for one year. Gift cards can be spent at any store in an Intu mall that accepts Mastercard.
  • The card also comes with 12 months' free Gourmet Society membership.
  • The card offers 12 months 0% on spending – though just because there's a 0% period, don't feel you need to use it. If you do use it, you'll pay 16.9% interest after the year's up, so make sure you clear the card balance by then, and pay off in full each month afterwards.
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Stats box
  • Cashback: Gift cards worth £20 on £250, £40 on £3,000 and £60 on £5,000 in year one
  • Paid out: Code emailed within 60 days; code must be exchanged for a gift card at an Intu shopping centre.
  • Max cashback/year: £60 in yr one, £20/yr after
  • Annual fee: None | Min spend: £250 | Card issuer: Mastercard
  • Rate: 16.9% representative APR (See Official APR Examples)
  • Min income: N/A
Barlcaycard Freedom Rewards

Earn rewards on everything you spend, plus chance of a bonus £20 of vouchers

Barclaycard Freedom Rewards*

If you're not tied to a particular rewards scheme, you could try Barclaycard's Freedom Rewards* card. While it doesn't offer as much in one specific place as the supermarket cards above, you'll earn more on your other spending, so it could be a good option if you don't have a regular supermarket. Plus, apply before 5 Oct and you could get a bonus 7,000 points, equivalent to a £20 voucher.

Need-to-knows
  • If you spend or balance transfer £500+ on the card in the first 60 days, you'll get a bonus 7,000 points worth £20 in vouchers - though you'll also need to pay on time & not bust your credit limit.
  • You earn points on spending which can be converted into vouchers with over 70 partners including Amazon, Boots and iTunes; 1,750 points will get you a £5 voucher.
  • You'll earn two points for every full £1 spent in supermarkets, petrol stations and with TfL (equivalent to 0.57% back) and one point for every full £1 spent elsewhere (0.29% back).
  • You can redeem your vouchers as soon as you've accumulated enough points.
  • You won't be eligible for the card if you already have a Barclaycard.
  • The card offers 12 months 0% on spending – though just because there's a 0% period, don't feel you need to use it. If you do use it, you'll pay 21.9% interest after, so make sure you clear the card balance by then, and then pay off in full each month afterwards.
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Stats box
  • Cashback: Vouchers equivalent to up to 0.57%
  • Paid out: On redemption
  • Max cashback/year: Unlimited
  • Annual fee: None | Min spend: N/A | Card issuer: Visa
  • Rate: 21.9% representative APR (See Official APR Example)
  • Min income: N/A
Key questions

What rewards can I get from this card? We've analysed how much you might get back from different levels of spending...

Annual overall spend £3,000 £5,000 £10,000 £20,000
Vouchers earned per year £13 £21 £43 £86
Assumes 50% of spend in supermarkets, petrol stations and with TfL and 50% elsewhere.

Linked to bank accounts

Some cards require you to have the issuing bank's current account to be eligible for the card. But it's usually not worth switching just to get the rewards on the credit cards - however, the two cards below are associated with some of our top pick bank accounts, so if you're switching anyway, see these cards as another perk on top.

TSB

TSB current account customers: Get up to £10 each month you spend £600+

TSB Platinum Purchase Card

Those with a TSB current account – one of our top-pick interest-paying bank accounts – can also get the TSB Platinum Purchase credit card. It gives 1% cashback on spending each month up to a maximum £5 and you can get another 5% cashback for Apple Pay payments, again up to £5 per month.

Need-to-knows
  • To qualify for cashback, you need to hold or switch to a TSB current account.
  • You need to spend £500 each month (excluding Apple Pay payments) to get the full £5. If you spend less, you'll still get 1% of it as cashback.
  • You can get a further 5% cashback on Apple Pay payments up to a maximum £100 spend (so a maximum £5).
  • Ensure you pay off in full every month, or you'll be charged 18.9% representative APR which'll quickly wipe out any cashback gain. The easiest way to repay in full is to set up a direct debit.
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Stats box
  • Cashback: 1% on spending (max £5/mth); 5% on Apple Pay (max £5/mth)
  • Paid out: Monthly
  • Max cashback/year: £120
  • Annual fee: None | Min spend: N/A | Card issuer: Mastercard
  • Rate: 18.9% representative APR (See Official APR Examples)
  • Min income: N/A
Halifax

Earn 0.5% unlimited cashback and load-free spending abroad

Nationwide Select*

If you already hold a Nationwide current account then you can get Nationwide's Select* credit card which gives 0.5% cashback on all spending in the UK. This card is also a best buy in our Travel Credit Cards guide, but it's not worth getting the current account just for this card as the cashback can be beaten.

Need to knows
  • To qualify, you need to hold a Nationwide FlexAccount current account and pay £750 a month into it (and have done so for the last three months), or the Nationwide FlexDirect (no fee, pays interest) or FlexPlus (£10/month) current account.
  • The Nationwide FlexAccount comes with free UK and European travel insurance.
  • There's also 12 months 0% on spending. After this you'll be charged 15.9% representative APR so ensure you clear the card before the interest kicks in.
Stats box
  • Representative variable APR: 15.9% (Official APR Example)
  • Annual fee: None
  • Reward scheme: Cashback, paid annually
  • Cashback: 0.5% of monthly spend
  • Minimum income: £5,000
  • Max cashback/year: Unlimited
  • Linked accounts: Any Nationwide current account

Boost the value of your points

Boost the value of your points and rewards

By correctly targeting the right rewards to redeem your points on, it is possible to substantially increase the amount. To find out how to do this for all schemes and specific info for Nectar, Avios and Tesco, read the Boost Your Loyalty Points guide.

Cashback sites may pay you for signing up

As an extra boon, members of specialist cashback websites can be paid when they sign up to some financial products. Do check that it’s exactly the same deal though, as terms can be different. And remember the cashback is never 100% guaranteed until it’s in your account. 

Full help to take advantage of this and pros & cons in our Top Cashback Sites guide.

Use the card for all spending

Once you set up a credit card, every time you use it you get paid. While this isn't an excuse to 'spend more', it does mean from now on…

Use the rewards card for ALL normal spending, replacing cash, cheques, and other debit, credit and charge cards.

For those who have work expenses they need to reclaim, this can be a powerful way to earn more, at no cost to you, provided you can cope with paying the bill in full each month.

There's extra protection on all spending too…

There's another big bonus to using a rewards card. You actually have far more consumer protection. This all comes about due to what's called Section 75 of the Consumer Credit Act 1974. It says…

75. - (1) If the debtor under a debtor-creditor-supplier agreement falling within section 12(b) or (c) has, in relation to a transaction financed by the agreement, any claim against the supplier in respect of a misrepresentation or breach of contract, he shall have a like claim against the creditor, who, with the supplier, shall accordingly be jointly and severally liable to the debtor.

Which of course, reads like gobbledegook… yet in a nutshell means:

Buy something costing over £100, here or abroad, and pay on a credit card, and the card issuer's equally liable if something goes wrong.

Now this protection only applies to credit cards, not debit cards or any other plastic and it's hugely important, especially in the current credit crunch climate. It means order something and if the retailer went kaput, you'd still be able to claim your money back from the card company. Read a full guide on Section 75 Refunds.

Think before adding the 'insurance'

Payment protection insurance is commonly sold with credit cards - the idea is it'll make some payments for you, usually for a year, if you are unable to (eg, if you lose your job).

Payment protection insurance and credit cardsThere have been a myriad of cases where it has been mis-sold. Some borrowers didn't realise they were signing up for it, or it was totally unsuitable for them. Some big lenders have been fined.

The protection isn't always bad, though policies sold by credit card companies are often overpriced (you pay a monthly amount depending on the size of your balance). If you want it, compare the lender's cover with standalone providers such as Paymentcare or Best Insurance.

Always be vigilant to check you aren't getting more than you bargained for when you fill in the application, then check your statement each month to check you aren't inadvertently paying for extras if you didn't ask for them.

Reward cards Q&A

  • I'm in debt, is it OK to use a reward card alongside my debt card?

  • Can I transfer a balance to a reward card?

  • How do they make money if I always repay?

  • How many reward cards can I have?

  • Is it worth going for a card that gives bigger rewards in one store?

  • Can I withdraw cash on a reward card?